English

Definition of disappoint verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    disappoint

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˌdɪsəˈpɔɪnt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌdɪsəˈpɔɪnt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they disappoint
    BrE BrE//ˌdɪsəˈpɔɪnt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌdɪsəˈpɔɪnt//
     
    he / she / it disappoints
    BrE BrE//ˌdɪsəˈpɔɪnts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌdɪsəˈpɔɪnts//
     
    past simple disappointed
    BrE BrE//ˌdɪsəˈpɔɪntɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌdɪsəˈpɔɪntɪd//
     
    past participle disappointed
    BrE BrE//ˌdɪsəˈpɔɪntɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌdɪsəˈpɔɪntɪd//
     
    -ing form disappointing
    BrE BrE//ˌdɪsəˈpɔɪntɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌdɪsəˈpɔɪntɪŋ//
     
    Unhappiness, Disappointment
     
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  1. 1  [transitive, intransitive] disappoint (somebody) | (it disappoints somebody that…) to make somebody feel sad because something that they hope for or expect to happen does not happen or is not as good as they hoped Her decision to cancel the concert is bound to disappoint her fans. I hate to disappoint you, but I'm just not interested. The movie had disappointed her (= it wasn't as good as she had expected). His latest novel does not disappoint. See related entries: Unhappiness, Disappointment
  2. 2[transitive] disappoint something to prevent something that somebody hopes for from becoming a reality The new government had soon disappointed the hopes of many of its supporters. See related entries: Disappointment
  3. Word Origin late Middle English (in the sense ‘deprive of a position’): from Old French desappointer.Extra examples I hate to disappoint the children when they’ve been looking forward to it so much. I hate to disappoint you, but I’m just not interested. If he agrees to the deal he will disappoint the expectations of many colleagues. The movie had disappointed her.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: disappoint