English

Definition of dislike verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

dislike

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//dɪsˈlaɪk//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈlaɪk//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they dislike
BrE BrE//dɪsˈlaɪk//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈlaɪk//
 
he / she / it dislikes
BrE BrE//dɪsˈlaɪks//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈlaɪks//
 
past simple disliked
BrE BrE//dɪsˈlaɪkt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈlaɪkt//
 
past participle disliked
BrE BrE//dɪsˈlaɪkt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈlaɪkt//
 
-ing form disliking
BrE BrE//dɪsˈlaɪkɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈlaɪkɪŋ//
 
 
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 (rather formal) to not like somebody/something dislike somebody/something Why do you dislike him so much? He disliked it when she behaved badly in front of his mother. dislike doing something I dislike being away from my family. Much as she disliked going to funerals (= although she did not like it at all), she knew she had to be there. dislike somebody/something doing something He disliked her staying away from home. Synonymshatedislike can’t stand despise can’t bear loathe detestThese words all mean to have a strong feeling of dislike for somebody/​something.hate to have a strong feeling of dislike for somebody/​something. Although hate is generally a very strong verb, it is also commonly used in spoken or informal English to talk about people or things that you dislike in a less important way, for example a particular type of food:He hates violence in any form. I’ve always hated cabbage.dislike (rather formal) to not like somebody/​something. Dislike is a rather formal word; it is less formal, and more usual, to say that you don’t like somebody/​something, especially in spoken English:I don’t like it when you phone me so late at night.can’t stand (rather informal) used to emphasize that you really do not like somebody/​something:I can’t stand his brother. She couldn’t stand being kept waiting.despise to dislike and have no respect for somebody/​something:He despised himself for being so cowardly.can’t bear used to say that you dislike something so much that you cannot accept or deal with it:I can’t bear having cats in the house.can’t stand or can’t bear?In many cases you can use either word, but can’t bear is slightly stronger and slightly more formal than can’t stand. loathe to hate somebody/​something very much:They loathe each other. Loathe is generally an even stronger verb than hate, but it can also be used more informally to talk about less important things, meaning ‘really don’t like’:Whether you love or loathe their music, you can’t deny their talent.detest (rather formal) to hate somebody/​something very much:They absolutely detest each other.Patterns I hate/​dislike/​can’t stand/​can’t bear/​loathe/​detest doing something. I hate/​can’t bear to do something. I hate/​dislike/​can’t stand/​can’t bear it when… I really hate/​dislike/​can’t stand/​despise/​can’t bear/​detest somebody/​something. I absolutely hate/​can’t stand/​loathe/​detest somebody/​something. opposite likeExtra examples He simply disliked working with committees and avoided it whenever possible. She disliked her boss intensely. The new teacher was universally disliked. There are very few foods that I actively dislike. He disliked it when she phoned him so late at night. He was disliked by most of his contemporaries. Most people dislike going to the dentist. Much as she disliked asking for help, she knew she had to. My father always disliked me staying away from home. Not only would she rather not go swimming, she actively dislikes it. The new regime is universally disliked. Though he seemed charming, the girl instinctively disliked him.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: dislike

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