Definition of disobey verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

disobey

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˌdɪsəˈbeɪ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌdɪsəˈbeɪ//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they disobey
BrE BrE//ˌdɪsəˈbeɪ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌdɪsəˈbeɪ//
 
he / she / it disobeys
BrE BrE//ˌdɪsəˈbeɪz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌdɪsəˈbeɪz//
 
past simple disobeyed
BrE BrE//ˌdɪsəˈbeɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌdɪsəˈbeɪd//
 
past participle disobeyed
BrE BrE//ˌdɪsəˈbeɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌdɪsəˈbeɪd//
 
-ing form disobeying
BrE BrE//ˌdɪsəˈbeɪɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌdɪsəˈbeɪɪŋ//
 
 
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[transitive, intransitive] disobey (somebody/something) to refuse to do what a person, a law, an order, etc. tells you to do; to refuse to obey He was punished for disobeying orders. How dare you disobey me! She sighed deeply but dared not disobey. opposite obey Word Origin late Middle English: from Old French desobeir, based on Latin oboedire ‘obey’, from ob- ‘in the direction of’ + audire ‘hear’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: disobey