Definition of disturb verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    disturb

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈstɜːb//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈstɜːrb//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they disturb
    BrE BrE//ˈstɜːb//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈstɜːrb//
     
    he / she / it disturbs
    BrE BrE//dɪˈstɜːbz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈstɜːrbz//
     
    past simple disturbed
    BrE BrE//ˈstɜːbd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈstɜːrbd//
     
    past participle disturbed
    BrE BrE//ˈstɜːbd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈstɜːrbd//
     
    -ing form disturbing
    BrE BrE//ˈstɜːbɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈstɜːrbɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  disturb somebody/something to interrupt somebody when they are trying to work, sleep, etc. I'm sorry to disturb you, but can I talk to you for a moment? If you get up early, try not to disturb everyone else. Do not disturb (= a sign placed on the outside of the door of a hotel room, office, etc.) She awoke early after a disturbed night. Only the cry of seabirds disturbed the silence.
  2. 2  disturb something to move something or change its position Don't disturb the papers on my desk.
  3. 3  to make somebody worry disturb somebody The letter shocked and disturbed me. it disturbs somebody to do something It disturbed her to realize that she was alone.
  4. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French destourber, from Latin disturbare, from dis- ‘utterly’ + turbare ‘disturb’ (from turba ‘tumult’).Extra examples I’m sorry to disturb you, but could you sign this letter? Don’t disturb her when she’s working. If you’re up early, try not to disturb the others. It disturbed her to realize that she was missing him already. Sorry to disturb you, but can I talk to you for a minute? There’s no point in disturbing him with something so trivial.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: disturb