Definition of edge verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    edge

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//edʒ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//edʒ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they edge
    BrE BrE//edʒ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//edʒ//
     
    he / she / it edges
    BrE BrE//ˈedʒɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈedʒɪz//
     
    past simple edged
    BrE BrE//edʒd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//edʒd//
     
    past participle edged
    BrE BrE//edʒd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//edʒd//
     
    -ing form edging
    BrE BrE//ˈedʒɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈedʒɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] to move or to move something slowly and carefully in a particular direction + adv./prep. She edged a little closer to me. I edged nervously past the dog. edge something + adv./prep. Emily edged her chair forward.
  2. 2[transitive, usually passive] edge something (with/in something) to put something around the edge of something The handkerchief is edged with lace.
  3. 3[intransitive] + adv./prep. to increase or decrease slightly Prices edged up 2% in the year to December.
  4. Word Origin Old English ecg ‘sharpened side of a blade’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch egge and German Ecke, also to Old Norse eggja ‘incite’, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin acies ‘edge’ and Greek akis ‘point’.Extra examples He drew level and for a moment edged ahead of his rival. He edged carefully along the narrow ledge. Heaton began to edge away from Jed and headed for the stairs. The Italian edged ahead to win the race. We slowly edged our way towards the exit. He tried to edge away. I edged gingerly down the rocky track. She edged her way to the front of the crowd. The handkerchief was edged with lace. Phrasal Verbsedge out somebody
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: edge