English

Definition of eject verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    eject

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//iˈdʒekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//iˈdʒekt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they eject
    BrE BrE//iˈdʒekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//iˈdʒekt//
     
    he / she / it ejects
    BrE BrE//iˈdʒekts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//iˈdʒekts//
     
    past simple ejected
    BrE BrE//iˈdʒektɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//iˈdʒektɪd//
     
    past participle ejected
    BrE BrE//iˈdʒektɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//iˈdʒektɪd//
     
    -ing form ejecting
    BrE BrE//iˈdʒektɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//iˈdʒektɪŋ//
     
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1[transitive] eject somebody (from something) (formal) to force somebody to leave a place or position synonym throw somebodyout (of…) Police ejected a number of violent protesters from the hall.
  2. 2[transitive] eject something (from something) to push something out suddenly and with a lot of force Used cartridges are ejected from the gun after firing.
  3. 3[intransitive] (of a pilot) to escape from an aircraft that is going to crash, sometimes using an ejector seat The pilot managed to eject moments before the plane crashed.
  4. 4[transitive, intransitive] eject (something) when you eject a disk, tape, etc., or when it ejects, it comes out of the machine after you have pressed a button
  5. Word Origin late Middle English: from Latin eject- ‘thrown out’, from the verb eicere, from e- (variant of ex-) ‘out’ + jacere ‘to throw’.Extra examples He was forcibly ejected from the restaurant. They were summarily ejected by the security guard. Angry supporters were forcibly ejected from the premises.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: eject