English

Definition of equate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

equate

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//iˈkweɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//iˈkweɪt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they equate
BrE BrE//iˈkweɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//iˈkweɪt//
 
he / she / it equates
BrE BrE//iˈkweɪts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//iˈkweɪts//
 
past simple equated
BrE BrE//iˈkweɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//iˈkweɪtɪd//
 
past participle equated
BrE BrE//iˈkweɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//iˈkweɪtɪd//
 
-ing form equating
BrE BrE//iˈkweɪtɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//iˈkweɪtɪŋ//
 
 
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equate something (with something) to think that something is the same as something else or is as important Some parents equate education with exam success. I don't see how you can equate the two things. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘make equal, balance’): from Latin aequat- ‘made level or equal’, from the verb aequare, from aequus ‘even, level, equal’. Current senses date from the mid 19th cent.Extra examples Invention and progress do not necessarily equate with improvement. It’s hard to equate this gentle woman with the monster portrayed in the newspapers. Money cannot be equated with happiness. The constellations in the night sky cannot be directly equated with the heroes of Greek mythology. We are taught to equate beauty with success. crudely equating happiness with a high income Phrasal Verbsequate to something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: equate

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