Definition of even adverb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    even

     adverb
    adverb
    BrE BrE//ˈiːvn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈiːvn//
     
     
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  1. 1  used to emphasize something unexpected or surprising He never even opened the letter (= so he certainly didn't read it). It was cold there even in summer (= so it must have been very cold in winter). Even a child can understand it (= so adults certainly can). She didn't even call to say she wasn't coming.
  2. 2  used when you are comparing things, to make the comparison stronger You know even less about it than I do. She's even more intelligent than her sister.
  3. 3used to introduce a more exact description of somebody/something It's an unattractive building, ugly even. Which Word?although / even though / though You can use these words to show contrast between two clauses or two sentences. Though is used more in spoken than in written English. You can use although, even though and though at the beginning of a sentence or clause that has a verb. Notice where the commas go:Although/​Even though/​Though everyone played well, we lost the game. We lost the game, although/​even though/​though everyone played well. You cannot use even on its own at the beginning of a sentence or clause instead of although, even though or though:Even everyone played well, we lost the game.
  4. Word Origin Old English efen (adjective), efne (adverb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch even, effen and German eben.Idioms (formal) just at the same time as somebody does something or as something else happens Even as he shouted the warning the car skidded.  despite the fact or belief that; no matter whether I'll get there, even if I have to walk. I like her, even though she can be annoying at times. Which Word?although / even though / though You can use these words to show contrast between two clauses or two sentences. Though is used more in spoken than in written English. You can use although, even though and though at the beginning of a sentence or clause that has a verb. Notice where the commas go:Although/​Even though/​Though everyone played well, we lost the game. We lost the game, although/​even though/​though everyone played well. You cannot use even on its own at the beginning of a sentence or clause instead of although, even though or though:Even everyone played well, we lost the game. and certainly not No explanation was offered, still less an apology. He’s too shy to ask a stranger the time, much less speak to a room full of people.
    1. 1  despite what has/had happened I've shown him the photographs but even now he won't believe me. Even then she would not admit her mistake.
    2. 2(formal) at this or that exact moment The troops are even now preparing to march into the city.
     despite that There are a lot of spelling mistakes; even so, it's quite a good essay.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: even