Definition of express verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    express

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪkˈspres//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪkˈspres//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they express
    BrE BrE//ɪkˈspres//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪkˈspres//
     
    he / she / it expresses
    BrE BrE//ɪkˈspresɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪkˈspresɪz//
     
    past simple expressed
    BrE BrE//ɪkˈsprest//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪkˈsprest//
     
    past participle expressed
    BrE BrE//ɪkˈsprest//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪkˈsprest//
     
    -ing form expressing
    BrE BrE//ɪkˈspresɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪkˈspresɪŋ//
     
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1  to show or make known a feeling, an opinion, etc. by words, looks or actions express something Teachers have expressed concern about the changes. His views have been expressed in numerous speeches. to express fears/doubts/reservations to express interest/regret/surprise express how, what, etc… Words cannot express how pleased I am. see also unexpressed
  2. 2  to speak, write or communicate in some other way what you think or feel express yourself Teenagers often have difficulty expressing themselves. express yourself + adv./prep. Perhaps I have not expressed myself very well. She expresses herself most fully in her paintings. (formal) express yourself + adj. They expressed themselves delighted.
  3. 3express itself (+ adv./prep.) (formal) (of a feeling) to become obvious in a particular way Their pleasure expressed itself in a burst of applause.
  4. 4 (mathematics) to represent something in a particular way, for example by symbols express something as something The figures are expressed as percentages. express something in something Educational expenditure is often expressed in terms of the amount spent per student.
  5. 5express something (from something) to remove air or liquid from something by pressing it Coconut milk is expressed from grated coconuts.
  6. 6express something (to somebody/something) (North American English) to send something by express post As soon as I receive payment I will express the book to you.
  7. Word Originverb late Middle English (also in the sense ‘press out, obtain by squeezing’, used figuratively to mean ‘extort’): from Old French expresser, based on Latin ex- ‘out’ + pressare ‘to press’. Extra examplesDifferences of opinion were freely expressed in public debate. He expressed his anger openly. Many patients feel unable to express their fears. Students must learn to express a point of view cogently and with clarity. The poet eloquently expresses the sense of lost innocence. He expressed himself freely on the subject of immigration. Teachers have expressed concern about the emphasis on testing. Words cannot express how pleased I am. to express (your, my, etc.) dissatisfaction/​fear/​horror/​gratitude/​desire
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: express