English

Definition of extent noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    extent

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ɪkˈstent//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪkˈstent//
     
    [singular, uncountable]
     
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  1. 1  how large, important, serious, etc. something is It is difficult to assess the full extent of the damage. She was exaggerating the true extent of the problem. I was amazed at the extent of his knowledge.
  2. 2the physical size of an area You can't see the full extent of the beach from here.
  3. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘valuation of property, especially for taxation’): from Anglo-Norman French extente, from medieval Latin extenta, feminine past participle of Latin extendere ‘stretch out’, from ex- ‘out’ + tendere ‘stretch’.Extra examples At its greatest extent the empire comprised most of western France. He had withdrawn from the company of his friends to an alarming extent. I will answer your questions about this case to the extent possible. People no longer live in small communities to the same extent as they used to. The government sought to play down the extent of the problem. The network had reached its greatest extent in route mileage. The operation revealed the extent of the cancer. The overall extent of civilian casualties remained unclear. The park is about 20 acres in extent. The pollution of the forest has seriously affected plant life and, to a lesser extent, wildlife. The victory underlined the extent to which Prussia had become a major power. Those figures actually understate the extent of the problem. To an extent East-West distrust continued throughout the war. To an extent= to some degree East-West distrust continued throughout the war. To some extent, we are all responsible for this tragic situation. We do not yet know the extent of her injuries. a lengthy agenda outlining the extent of global environmental problems a statement defining the extent of Latvia’s territory to reduce the extent of deforestation He had changed to such an extent that I no longer recognized him. The book discusses the extent to which family life has changed over the past 50 years. The island is 300 square kilometres in extent. To some extent what she argues is true. To what extent is this true of all schools? You can’t see the full extent of the beach from here.Idioms  used to show how far something is true or how great an effect it has To a certain extent, we are all responsible for this tragic situation. He had changed to such an extent (= so much) that I no longer recognized him. To some extent what she argues is true. The pollution of the forest has seriously affected plant life and, to a lesser extent, wildlife. To what extent is this true of all schools? The book discusses the extent to which (= how much) family life has changed over the past 50 years. Language BankgenerallyWays of saying ‘in general’ Women generally earn less than men. Generally speaking, jobs traditionally done by women are paid at a lower rate than those traditionally done by men. In general/By and large, women do not earn as much as men. Certain jobs, like nursing and cleaning, are still mainly carried out by women. Senior management posts are predominantly held by men. Most senior management posts tend to be held by men. Women are, for the most part, still paid less than men. Economic and social factors are, to a large extent, responsible for women being concentrated in low-paid jobs.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: extent