Definition of fact noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    fact

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//fækt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//fækt//
     
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1  [singular] fact (that…) used to refer to a particular situation that exists I could no longer ignore the fact that he was deeply unhappy. Despite the fact that she was wearing a seat belt, she was thrown sharply forward. Due to the fact that they did not read English, the prisoners were unaware of what they were signing. She was happy apart from the fact that she could not return home. Voluntary work was particularly important in view of the fact that women were often forced to give up paid work on marriage. How do you account for the fact that unemployment is still rising? The fact remains that we are still two teachers short. The mere fact of being poor makes such children criminals in the eyes of the police. Language BankhoweverWays of saying ‘but’ Politicians have promised to improve road safety. So far, however, little has been achieved. Despite clear evidence from road safety studies, no new measures have been introduced. Politicians have promised to improve road safety. In spite of this/Despite this, little has been achieved so far. Although politicians have promised to improve road safety, little has been achieved so far. Some politicians claim that the new transport policy has been a success. In fact, it has been a total disaster. Government campaigns have had a measure of success, but the fact remains that large numbers of accidents are still caused by careless drivers.
  2. 2  [countable] a thing that is known to be true, especially when it can be proved Isn't it a fact that the firm is losing money? (informal) I haven't spoken to anyone in English for days and that's a fact. I know for a fact (= I am certain) that she's involved in something illegal. The judge instructed both lawyers to stick to the facts of the case. First, some basic facts about healthy eating! The report is based on hard facts (= information that can be proved to be true). If you're going to make accusations, you'd better get your facts right (= make sure your information is correct). It’s about time you learnt to face (the) facts(= accepted the truth about the situation).
  3. 3  [uncountable] things that are true rather than things that have been invented The story is based on fact. It's important to distinguish fact from fiction.
  4. Language BankhoweverWays of saying ‘but’ Politicians have promised to improve road safety. So far, however, little has been achieved. Despite clear evidence from road safety studies, no new measures have been introduced. Politicians have promised to improve road safety. In spite of this/Despite this, little has been achieved so far. Although politicians have promised to improve road safety, little has been achieved so far. Some politicians claim that the new transport policy has been a success. In fact, it has been a total disaster. Government campaigns have had a measure of success, but the fact remains that large numbers of accidents are still caused by careless drivers. Word Origin late 15th cent.: from Latin factum, neuter past participle of facere ‘do’. The original sense was ‘an act’, later ‘a crime’, surviving in the phrase before (or after) the fact. The earliest of the current senses (‘truth, reality’) dates from the late 16th cent.Extra examples All the facts and figures were presented at the meeting. Do you know for a fact that he is in London? Due to the fact that they did not read English, the prisoners were unaware of what they were signing. For God’s sake, look at the facts! He doesn’t seem able to grasp this basic fact. He got the job, despite the fact that he has no experience. He knew their bitterness stemmed from the fact that he was in charge. Historians must first select the facts that they present. I appreciate the fact that you’re under a lot of pressure at the moment. I think you need to check your facts. I thought the work would be difficult. In actual fact, it’s very easy. I used to live in France; in fact, not far from where you’re going. I’m afraid you’ll have to face facts. She’ll never marry you. I’m not making excuses—I’m just stating a fact. If he was bored, he managed to hide the fact very well. If you’re going to make accusations, you’d better get your facts right. It is a well-known fact that girls do better than boys at school. It is an sad fact of life that the most deserving people do not often achieve the most success. It’s a simple statement of fact. It’s not wild speculation! It’s a plain matter of fact. It’s very hard to do this on a home computer. Not to mention the fact that it’s actually illegal. Just stick to the facts. No one can deny this fact. Prices reflect the fact that the company is aiming at the luxury market. She already knew the facts she needed. She resented the fact that I had more freedom than her. She resented the fact that I was older and had more freedom than her. She was happy, apart from the fact that she could not return home. She wouldn’t accept the fact that she had lost. She’s taking her children on holiday, despite the fact that school starts tomorrow. Students need time to assimilate the facts. The Loch Ness Monster: fact or fiction? The fact remains that we are still two teachers short. The facts of the case are quite straightforward. The findings are not surprising, given the facts:… The job of the teacher is not simply to impart facts. The known facts of the case are as follows. The mere fact of your being there will arouse their suspicions. The police have to support their case with hard facts. The problem was compounded by the fact that I had no idea what I was looking for—only ‘some sort of clue’. The recent improvements should not obscure the fact that general standards are still far too low. The report draws attention to the fact that the country is now a net exporter of the product. These are all incontrovertible facts. These facts have not yet been proved. This approach ignores the fact that people, not computers, commit crimes. This does not change the fact that a crime has been committed. We don’t have all the facts yet. We learned several interesting facts about elephants. We sat miserably in the pub, lamenting the fact that our dry clothes were a 60-mile bus journey away. We waited miserably, lamenting the fact that our suitcases had been put on the wrong plane. When making your presentation, it is important to have all the facts at your fingertips. You must look at all the relevant facts. a growing recognition of the fact that learning may take different forms a novel based on historical fact a rather harsh fact of life different ways of interpreting the facts the bare facts of war the best way of establishing the facts Despite the fact that she was wearing a seat belt, she was thrown sharply forward. First, let’s look at some basic facts about healthy eating. I know for a fact that he’s involved in something illegal. I wish you’d get your facts right! I’ve asked to see all the facts and figures before I make a decision. Isn’t it a fact that the firm is losing money? It’s a fact of life that you don’t get anything for nothing. It’s important to distinguish fact from fiction. It’s time you learnt to face the facts. She’d never even met him till last week and that’s a fact. The facts speak for themselves. The judge ordered both lawyers to stick to the facts. The report is based on hard facts. There are certain facts you need to be aware of.Idioms after something has happened or been done, when it is too late to prevent it or change it On some vital decisions employees were only informed after the fact.
    1. 1  used to add a comment on something that you have just said, usually adding something that you think the other person will be interested in It's a nice place. We've stayed there ourselves, as a matter of fact.
    2. 2  used to disagree with something that somebody has just said synonym actually ‘I suppose you'll be leaving soon, then?’ ‘No, as a matter of fact I'll be staying for another two years.’
    the fact (of the matter) is (that)…
     
    jump to other results
    used to emphasize a statement, especially one that is the opposite of what has just been mentioned A new car would be wonderful but the fact of the matter is that we can't afford one.
    a situation that cannot be changed, especially one that is unpleasant It’s a fact of life that some people will always be racist. accurate and detailed information I've asked to see all the facts and figures before I make a decision. More Like This Alliteration in idioms belt and braces, black and blue, born and bred, chalk and cheese, chop and change, done and dusted, down and dirty, in dribs and drabs, eat somebody out of house and home, facts and figures, fast and furious, first and foremost, forgive and forget, hale and hearty, hem and haw, kith and kin, mix and match, part and parcel, puff and pant, to rack and ruin, rant and rave, risk life and limb, short and sweet, signed and sealed, spic and span, through thick and thin, this and that, top and tail, tried and tested, wax and waneSee worksheet. the details about sex and about how babies are born, especially as told to children
    the facts speak for themselves
     
    jump to other results
    it is not necessary to give any further explanation about something because the information that is available already proves that it is true
    1. 1  used to give extra details about something that has just been mentioned I used to live in France; in fact, not far from where you're going.
    2. 2  used to emphasize a statement, especially one that is the opposite of what has just been mentioned I thought the work would be difficult. In actual fact, it's very easy.
    used to say what is true in a situation In point of fact, she is their adopted daughter. (informal) used to reply to a statement that you find interesting or surprising, or that you do not believe ‘She says I'm one of the best students she's ever taught.’ ‘Is that a fact?’
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: fact