Definition of fate noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    fate

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//feɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//feɪt//
     
    Types of belief
     
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  1. 1[countable] the things, especially bad things, that will happen or have happened to somebody/something The fate of the three men is unknown. She sat outside, waiting to find out her fate. The court will decide our fate/fates. Each of the managers suffered the same fate. The government had abandoned the refugees to their fate. From that moment our fate was sealed (= our future was decided).
  2. 2[uncountable] the power that is believed to control everything that happens and that cannot be stopped or changed Fate was kind to me that day. By a strange twist of fate, Andy and I were on the same plane. Synonymsluckchance coincidence accident fate destinyThese are all words for things that happen or the force that causes them to happen.luck the force that causes good or bad things to happen to people:This ring has always brought me good luck.chance the way that some things happen without any cause that you can see or understand:The results could simply be due to chance.coincidence the fact of two things happening at the same time by chance, in a surprising way:They met through a series of strange coincidences.accident something that happens unexpectedly and is not planned in advance:Their early arrival was just an accident.fate the power that is believed to control everything that happens and that cannot be stopped or changed:Fate decreed that she would never reach America.destiny the power that is believed to control events:I believe there’s some force guiding us—call it God, destiny or fate.fate or destiny? Fate can be kind, but this is an unexpected gift; just as often, fate is cruel and makes people feel helpless. Destiny is more likely to give people a sense of power: people who have a strong sense of destiny usually believe that they are meant to be great or do great things.Patterns by …luck/​chance/​coincidence/​accident It’s no coincidence/​accident that… pure/​sheer luck/​chance/​coincidence/​accident to believe in luck/​coincidences/​fate/​destiny See related entries: Types of belief
  3. Wordfinderamulet, charm, coincidence, fate, fortune, jinx, luck, mascot, superstition, talisman Word Origin late Middle English: from Italian fato or (later) from its source, Latin fatum ‘that which has been spoken’, from fari ‘speak’.Extra examples Anne accepted the cruel hand that fate had dealt her. Fate decreed that she would never reach America. Fate took a hand in the outcome of the championship. Fate took a hand in= influenced the outcome of the championship. Fate was kind to me. Fate was not smiling upon her today. For some reason fate conspired against them and everything they did was problematic. Fortunately, Robert was spared this cruel fate. Getting married seemed a fate worse than death. He believed that the universe was controlled by the whims of a cruel fate. He faces a grim fate if he is sent back to his own country. He had no desire to share the fate of his executed comrades. He had signed his confession and sealed his own fate. He secretly hoped that fate would intervene and save him having to meet her. He was content standing aside, letting fate take its course. He will learn his fate in court tomorrow. His brother met an altogether different fate. His fate rests in the hands of the judges. I have a great deal of trust and I leave everything to fate. Instead of just bemoaning your fate, why not do something to change it? It seemed a cruel twist of fate that the composer should have died so young. It would be tempting fate to say that we will definitely win the game. Jackson deserves a better fate than this. Little did she know what fate had in store for her. Obeying her parents’ wishes for her life seemed a fate worse than death. Only weeks after her previous injury, fate struck again, leaving her unable to compete. Only weeks later fate struck again, leaving her unable to compete. Our fate is tied to yours. She broke her ankle before the big game, then suffered the same fate a month later. She faces an uncertain fate. She has taken steps to control her own fate. She managed to escape the fate of the other rebels. Such coincidences are almost enough to make one believe in fate. The condemned men were resigned to their fate. The convicts awaited their fate in prison. The fate of the African wild dog hangs in the balance. The jury held the fate of the accused in their hands. The new job had come at just the right time for him. Was it the hand of fate? The ultimate fate of the captured troops is unknown. They decided to kill themselves rather than suffer a worse fate at the hands of their enemy. They were warned of the dreadful fate that awaited them if ever they returned to their homes. They’re worried about their political fate. This team’s fate depends on how it performs today. Under-representation is the likely fate of small parties. What an unfortunate fate the gods had condemned her to. What had he done to deserve such a terrible fate? Will it change the fate of the company? Worst of all was the fate that befell the captured rebel general. the almost inevitable fate awaiting gorillas and tigers the prophet who predicts fate and can see the future the rights of a woman to choose the fate of her body By a strange twist of fate, Andy and I were on the same plane. Each of the managers suffered the same fate. From the moment the hijackers took over the plane, their fate was sealed. He had no idea what fate was in store for him. He suddenly started to rail against fate and all the things that had happened to him. She felt it would be tempting fate to try the difficult climb a second time. The court will decide our fate/​fates. The fate of the ship’s captain is unknown. The government had abandoned the refugees to their fate.Idioms
    a fate worse than death
     
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    (often humorous) a terrible thing that could happen At the last minute the hero saves her from a fate worse than death.
    to do something too confidently in a way that might mean that your good luck will come to an end She felt it would be tempting fate to try the difficult climb a second time.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: fate

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