English

Definition of figure verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    figure

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈfɪɡə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈfɪɡjər//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they figure
    BrE BrE//ˈfɪɡə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈfɪɡjər//
     
    he / she / it figures
    BrE BrE//ˈfɪɡəz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈfɪɡjərz//
     
    past simple figured
    BrE BrE//ˈfɪɡəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈfɪɡjərd//
     
    past participle figured
    BrE BrE//ˈfɪɡəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈfɪɡjərd//
     
    -ing form figuring
    BrE BrE//ˈfɪɡəɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈfɪɡjərɪŋ//
     
     
    jump to other results
    be important
  1. 1  [intransitive] to be part of a process, situation, etc. especially an important part synonym feature My feelings about the matter didn't seem to figure at all. figure (as something) (in/on/among something) Do I still figure in your plans? The question of the peace settlement is likely to figure prominently in the talks. It did not figure high on her list of priorities.
  2. think/decide
  3. 2[transitive] (informal) to think or decide that something will happen or is true figure (that)… I figured (that) if I took the night train, I could be in Scotland by morning. We figured the sensible thing to do was to wait. figure something That's what I figured. figure why, whether, etc… He tried to figure why she had come.
  4. calculate
  5. 3[transitive] figure something (at something) (North American English) to calculate an amount or the cost of something We figured the attendance at 150 000.
  6. Word Origin Middle English (in the senses ‘distinctive shape of a person or thing’, ‘representation of something material or immaterial’, and ‘numerical symbol’, among others): from Old French figure (noun), figurer (verb), from Latin figura ‘shape, figure, form’; related to fingere ‘form, contrive’.Extra examples The issue figured prominently in our discussion. This man did not figure among the suspects. Vegetables hardly figure at all in their diet. I figured (that) if I took the night train, I could be in Scotland by morning. I figured him to be well over 40. If we can figure roughly how much it will cost, we can decide what to do. My feelings about the matter didn’t seem to figure at all. She tried to figure who might have made the call. That’s exactly what I figured. The cost of manufacture is figured at $15 000. There was only one thing to do, he figured.Idioms (North American English, informal) used to say that you do not understand the reason for something, or that you do not want to give an explanation for something because you think it is obvious People are more aware of the risks of smoking nowadays, but more young women are smoking than ever. Go figure! used to say that something was expected or seems logical ‘John called in sick.’ ‘That figures, he wasn't feeling well yesterday.’ (disapproving) ‘She was late again.’ ‘Yes, that figures.’ Phrasal Verbsfigure on somethingfigure out somebody
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: figure