Definition of flap verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    flap

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//flæp//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//flæp//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they flap
    BrE BrE//flæp//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//flæp//
     
    he / she / it flaps
    BrE BrE//flæps//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//flæps//
     
    past simple flapped
    BrE BrE//flæpt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//flæpt//
     
    past participle flapped
    BrE BrE//flæpt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//flæpt//
     
    -ing form flapping
    BrE BrE//ˈflæpɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈflæpɪŋ//
     
    Excitement
     
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    move quickly
  1. 1[transitive, intransitive] flap (something) if a bird flaps its wings, or if its wings flap, they move quickly up and down synonym beat The bird flapped its wings and flew away. The gulls flew off, wings flapping.
  2. 2[intransitive, transitive] to move or to make something move up and down or from side to side, often making a noise (+ adv./prep.) The sails flapped in the breeze. Two large birds flapped (= flew) slowly across the water. flap something She walked up and down, flapping her arms to keep warm. A gust of wind flapped the tents.
  3. be worried/excited
  4. 3[intransitive] (British English, informal) to behave in an anxious or excited way There's no need to flap—I've got everything under control. See related entries: Excitement
  5. phonetics
  6. 4 [transitive] flap something = tap
  7. Word Origin Middle English: probably imitative.Extra examples The sails flapped wildly in the stiff breeze. Her wet skirt flapped around her knees. His coat flapped open. The man was flapping a large white sheet.Idioms
    somebody’s ears are flapping
     
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    (British English, informal) a person is trying to listen to somebody else’s conversation
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: flap

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