Definition of foot noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    foot

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//fʊt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//fʊt//
     
    (pl. feet
    BrE BrE//fiːt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//fiːt//
     
    )
    Body parts, Poetry
     
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    part of body
  1. 1   [countable] the lowest part of the leg, below the ankle, on which a person or an animal stands My feet are aching. to get/rise to your feet (= stand up) I've been on my feet (= standing or walking around) all day. We came on foot (= we walked). Come on lads—on your feet and do some work! walking around the house in bare feet (= not wearing shoes or socks) Please wipe your feet (= your shoes) on the mat. Daniel was shifting anxiously from foot to foot. a foot pump (= operated using your foot, not your hand) a foot passenger (= one who travels on a ferry without a car) Synonymsstandget up stand up rise get to your feet be on your feetThese words all mean to be in an upright position with your weight on your feet, or to put yourself in this position.stand to be in an upright position with your weight on your feet:She was too weak to stand. Stand still when I’m talking to you! Stand is usually used with an adverb or prepositional phrase to show where or how somebody stands, but sometimes another phrase or clause is used to show what somebody does while they are standing:We stood talking for a few minutes. He stood and looked out to sea.get up to get into a standing position from a sitting, kneeling or lying position:Please don’t get up!stand up to be in a standing position; to stand after sitting:Stand up straight! Everyone would stand up when the teacher entered the classroom.stand, get up or stand up?Stand usually means ‘to be in a standing position’ but can also mean ‘to get into a standing position’. Stand up can be used with either of these meanings, but its use is more restricted: it is used especially when somebody tells somebody or a group of people to stand. Get up is the most frequent way of saying ‘get into a standing position’, and this can be from a sitting, kneeling or lying position; if you stand up, this is nearly always after sitting, especially on a chair. If you want to tell somebody politely that they do not need to move from their chair, use get up:Please don’t stand up!rise (formal) to get into a standing position from a sitting, kneeling or lying position:Would you all rise, please, to welcome our visiting speaker.get to your feet to stand up after sitting, kneeling or lying:I helped her to get to her feet.be on your feet to be standing up:I’ve been on my feet all day. CollocationsPhysical appearance A person may be described as having:Eyes (bright) blue/​green/(dark/​light) brown/​hazel eyes deep-set/​sunken/​bulging/​protruding eyes small/​beady/​sparkling/​twinkling/(informal) shifty eyes piercing/​penetrating/​steely eyes bloodshot/​watery/​puffy eyes bushy/​thick/​dark/​raised/​arched eyebrows long/​dark/​thick/​curly/​false eyelashes/​lashesFace a flat/​bulbous/​pointed/​sharp/​snub nose a straight/​a hooked/​a Roman/(formal) an aquiline nose full/​thick/​thin/​pouty lips dry/​chapped/​cracked lips flushed/​rosy/​red/​ruddy/​pale cheeks soft/​chubby/​sunken cheeks white/​perfect/​crooked/​protruding teeth a large/​high/​broad/​wide/​sloping forehead a strong/​weak/​pointed/​double chin a long/​full/​bushy/​wispy/​goatee beard a long/​thin/​bushy/​droopy/​handlebar/​pencil moustache/ (especially US English) mustacheHair and skin pale/​fair/​olive/​dark/​tanned skin dry/​oily/​smooth/​rough/​leathery/​wrinkled skin a dark/​pale/​light/​sallow/​ruddy/​olive/​swarthy/​clear complexion deep/​fine/​little/​facial wrinkles blonde/​blond/​fair/(light/​dark) brown/(jet-)black/​auburn/​red/(British English) ginger/​grey hair straight/​curly/​wavy/​frizzy/​spiky hair thick/​thin/​fine/​bushy/​thinning hair dyed/​bleached/​soft/​silky/​dry/​greasy/​shiny hair long/​short/​shoulder-length/​cropped hair a bald/​balding/​shaved head a receding hairline a bald patch/​spot a side/​centre/(US English) center (British English) parting/ (North American English) partBody a long/​short/​thick/​slender/(disapproving) scrawny neck broad/​narrow/​sloping/​rounded/​hunched shoulders a bare/​broad/​muscular/​small/​large chest a flat/​swollen/​bulging stomach a small/​tiny/​narrow/​slim/​slender/28-inch waist big/​wide/​narrow/​slim hips a straight/​bent/​arched/​broad/​hairy back thin/​slender/​muscular arms big/​large/​small/​manicured/​calloused/​gloved hands long/​short/​fat/​slender/​delicate/​bony fingers long/​muscular/​hairy/​shapely/(both informal, often disapproving) skinny/​spindly legs muscular/​chubby/(informal, disapproving) flabby thighs big/​little/​small/​dainty/​wide/​narrow/​bare feet a good/​a slim/​a slender/​an hourglass figure be of slim/​medium/​average/​large/​athletic/​stocky build see also athlete’s foot, barefoot, club foot, underfoot See related entries: Body parts
  2. -footed
  3. 2(in adjectives and adverbs) having or using the type or number of foot/feet mentioned bare-footed four-footed a left-footed shot into the corner see also flat-footed, sure-footed More Like This Compound adjectives for physical characteristics -beaked, -bellied, -billed, -blooded, -bodied, -cheeked, -chested, -eared, -eyed, -faced, -fingered, -footed, -haired, -handed, -headed, -hearted, -hipped, -lidded, -limbed, -mouthed, -necked, -nosed, -skinned, -tailed, -throated, -toothedSee worksheet.
  4. part of sock
  5. 3[countable, usually singular] the part of a sock, stocking, etc. that covers the foot
  6. base/bottom
  7. 4  [singular] the foot of something the lowest part of something; the base or bottom of something the foot of the stairs/page/mountain The nurse hung a chart at the foot of the bed (= the part of the bed where your feet normally are when you are lying in it). Synonymsbottombase foundation footThese are all words for the lowest part of something.bottom [usually sing.] the lowest part of something:Footnotes are given at the bottom of each page. I waited for them at the bottom of the hill.base [usually sing.] the lowest part of something, especially the part or surface on which it rests or stands:The lamp has a heavy base.foundation [usually pl.] a layer of bricks, concrete, etc. that forms the solid underground base of a building:to lay the foundations of the new schoolfoot [sing.] the lowest part of something:At the foot of the stairs she turned to face him.bottom or foot? Foot is used to talk about a limited number of things: it is used most often with tree, hill/​mountain, steps/​stairs and page. Bottom can be used to talk about a much wider range of things, including those mentioned above for foot. Foot is generally used in more literary contexts.Patterns at/​near/​towards the bottom/​base/​foot of something on the bottom/​base of something (a) firm/​solid/​strong base/​foundation(s)
  8. measurement
  9. 5  (feet, foot) (abbreviation ft) a unit for measuring length equal to 12 inches or 30.48 centimetres a 6-foot high wall We're flying at 35 000 feet. ‘How tall are you?’ ‘Five foot nine’ (= five feet and nine inches).
  10. -footer
  11. 6(in compound nouns) a person or thing that is a particular number of feet tall or long His boat is an eighteen-footer. Both my brothers are six-footers.
  12. in poetry
  13. 7[singular] (specialist) a unit of rhythm in a line of poetry containing one stressed syllable and one or more syllables without stress. Each of the four divisions in the following line is a foot For men / may come / and men / may go. See related entries: Poetry
  14. Word Origin Old English fōt, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch voet and German Fuss, from an Indo-European root shared by Sanskrit pad, pāda, Greek pous, pod-, and Latin pes, ped- ‘foot’.Extra examples Foot passengers were allowed to leave the ferry before the vehicles. He raised his foot off the accelerator pedal. He shifted his weight onto his back foot. He swung a foot at the ball but missed completely. He’s broken several bones in his left foot. His foot caught in the cable and he fell under the train. My foot slipped as I was about to shoot and I missed the ball. She kicked the ball with her right foot. She put her foot down on the accelerator and the car lurched forward. She was dressed from head to foot in green velvet. She was tapping her foot impatiently. That man trod on my foot and he didn’t even apologize. The city is best explored on foot. They looked unsure and shifted uneasily from foot to foot. soldiers on foot patrol At the foot of the stairs she turned to face him.Idioms
    be rushed/run off your feet
     
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    to be extremely busy; to have too many things to do Weekdays are slow in the restaurant, but at weekends the staff are rushed off their feet.
      bind/tie somebody hand and foot
       
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    1. 1to tie somebody’s hands and feet together so that they cannot move or escape
    2. 2to prevent somebody from doing what they want by creating rules, restrictions, etc.
    the boot is on the other foot(British English)(North American English the shoe is on the other foot)
     
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    used to say that a situation has changed so that somebody now has power or authority over the person who used to have power or authority over them
    cut the ground from under somebody’s feet
     
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    to suddenly spoil somebody’s idea or plan by doing something to stop them from continuing with it
    to be deliberately slow in doing something or in making a decision to be lucky in finding yourself in a good situation, or in getting out of a difficult situation You landed on your feet, getting such a well-paid job with so little experience. Jim’s always getting himself in trouble, but he usually seems to fall on his feet.
    1. 1with your feet touching the ground before any other part of your body He landed feet first.
    2. 2(humorous) if you leave a place feet first, you are carried out after you are dead You'll have to carry me out feet first!
    to become able to act independently and with confidence I only recently joined the firm so I'm still finding my feet. (informal, humorous) a strong way of saying that you disagree completely with what has just been said ‘Ian can't come because he's tired.’ ‘Tired my foot! Lazy more like!’ covering your whole body We were covered from head to foot in mud. She was dressed from head to toe in red. (informal) to suddenly become nervous about doing something that you had planned to do He was going to ask her but he got cold feet and said nothing. See related entries: Nervous (especially North American English, informal) to start doing something that is new for you At that time he was a young actor, just getting his feet wet.
    get/have a/your foot in the door
     
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    to manage to enter an organization, a field of business, etc. that could bring you success I always wanted to work in TV but it took me two years to get a foot in the door.
    (informal) to want to travel or move to a different place; to want to do something different After a few years in one place, I get itchy feet.
    get/start off on the right/wrong foot (with somebody)
     
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    (informal) to start a relationship well/badly I seem to have got off on the wrong foot with the new boss.
    to have a fault or weakness in your character When the actor was imprisoned for drug offences, his fans were upset to find that their hero had feet of clay.
    have/keep your feet on the ground
     
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    to have a sensible and realistic attitude to life In spite of his overnight stardom he still manages to keep his feet on the ground.
    have/keep a foot in both camps
     
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    to be involved in or connected with two different or opposing groups
    have one foot in the grave
     
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    (informal) to be so old or ill/sick that you are not likely to live much longer See related entries: Being ill
    (informal) to be very awkward in your movements, especially when you are dancing or playing a sport
    have the world at your feet
     
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    to be very successful and admired
    in your stocking(ed) feet
     
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    wearing socks or stockings but not shoes
    not let the grass grow under your feet
     
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    to not delay in getting things done
    completely well or in a normal state again after an illness or a time of trouble Sue's back on her feet again after her operation. The new chairman hopes to get the company back on its feet within six months. Synonymsstandget up stand up rise get to your feet be on your feetThese words all mean to be in an upright position with your weight on your feet, or to put yourself in this position.stand to be in an upright position with your weight on your feet:She was too weak to stand. Stand still when I’m talking to you! Stand is usually used with an adverb or prepositional phrase to show where or how somebody stands, but sometimes another phrase or clause is used to show what somebody does while they are standing:We stood talking for a few minutes. He stood and looked out to sea.get up to get into a standing position from a sitting, kneeling or lying position:Please don’t get up!stand up to be in a standing position; to stand after sitting:Stand up straight! Everyone would stand up when the teacher entered the classroom.stand, get up or stand up?Stand usually means ‘to be in a standing position’ but can also mean ‘to get into a standing position’. Stand up can be used with either of these meanings, but its use is more restricted: it is used especially when somebody tells somebody or a group of people to stand. Get up is the most frequent way of saying ‘get into a standing position’, and this can be from a sitting, kneeling or lying position; if you stand up, this is nearly always after sitting, especially on a chair. If you want to tell somebody politely that they do not need to move from their chair, use get up:Please don’t stand up!rise (formal) to get into a standing position from a sitting, kneeling or lying position:Would you all rise, please, to welcome our visiting speaker.get to your feet to stand up after sitting, kneeling or lying:I helped her to get to her feet.be on your feet to be standing up:I’ve been on my feet all day. See related entries: Recovering from illness
    the patter of tiny feet
     
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    (informal or humorous) a way of referring to children when somebody wants, or is going to have, a baby We can't wait to hear the patter of tiny feet.
    pull the rug (out) from under somebody’s feet
     
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    (informal) to take help or support away from somebody suddenly
    put your best foot forward
     
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    to make a great effort to do something, especially if it is difficult or you are feeling tired
    to sit down and relax, especially with your feet raised and supported After a hard day's work, it's nice to get home and put your feet up.
    1. 1to be very strict in opposing what somebody wishes to do You've got to put your foot down and make him stop seeing her.
    2. 2(British English) to drive faster She put her foot down and roared past them.
    put your foot in it(British English)(also put your foot in your mouth North American English, British English)
     
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    to say or do something that upsets, offends or embarrasses somebody I really put my foot in it with Ella—I didn't know she'd split up with Tom.
    (usually used in negative sentences) to make a mistake In the last two games he has hardly put a foot wrong.
    set foot in/on something
     
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    to enter or visit a place the first man to set foot on the moon I vowed never to set foot in the place again.
    set somebody/something on their/its feet
     
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    to make somebody/something independent or successful His business sense helped set the club on its feet again.
    the shoe is on the other foot(North American English)(British English the boot is on the other foot)
     
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    used to say that a situation has changed so that somebody now has power or authority over the person who used to have power or authority over them
    shoot yourself in the foot
     
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    (informal) to do or say something that will cause you a lot of trouble or harm, especially when you are trying to get an advantage for yourself
    sit at somebody’s feet
     
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    to admire somebody very much, especially a teacher or somebody from whom you try to learn
    stand on your own (two) feet
     
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    to be independent and able to take care of yourself When his parents died he had to learn to stand on his own two feet.
    sweep somebody off their feet
     
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    to make somebody fall suddenly and deeply in love with you She’s waiting for some hero to come and sweep her off her feet. See related entries: Love
    take the weight off your feet
     
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    (informal) to sit down and rest, especially when you are tired Come and sit down and take the weight off your feet for a while.
    to be able to think and react to things very quickly and effectively without any preparation in the way; stopping you from working, etc. I don't want you kids under my feet while I'm cooking. to show what you think about something by going or not going somewhere Shoppers voted with their feet and avoided the store.
    wait on somebody hand and foot
     
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    (disapproving) to take care of somebody’s needs so well that they do not have to do anything for themselves He seems to expect me to wait on him hand and foot.
    walk somebody off their feet
     
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    (informal) to make somebody walk so far or so fast that they are very tired I hope I haven’t walked you off your feet.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: foot