Definition of fulminate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

fulminate

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈfʊlmɪneɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʊlmɪneɪt//
 
; BrE BrE//ˈfʌlmɪneɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʌlmɪneɪt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they fulminate
BrE BrE//ˈfʊlmɪneɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʊlmɪneɪt//
 
; BrE BrE//ˈfʌlmɪneɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʌlmɪneɪt//
 
he / she / it fulminates
BrE BrE//ˈfʊlmɪneɪts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʊlmɪneɪts//
 
; BrE BrE//ˈfʌlmɪneɪts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʌlmɪneɪts//
 
past simple fulminated
BrE BrE//ˈfʊlmɪneɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʊlmɪneɪtɪd//
 
; BrE BrE//ˈfʌlmɪneɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʌlmɪneɪtɪd//
 
past participle fulminated
BrE BrE//ˈfʊlmɪneɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʊlmɪneɪtɪd//
 
; BrE BrE//ˈfʌlmɪneɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʌlmɪneɪtɪd//
 
-ing form fulminating
BrE BrE//ˈfʊlmɪneɪtɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʊlmɪneɪtɪŋ//
 
; BrE BrE//ˈfʌlmɪneɪtɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʌlmɪneɪtɪŋ//
 
 
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[intransitive] fulminate against (somebody/something) (formal) to criticize somebody/something angrily He was always fulminating against interference from the government. Word Origin late Middle English: from Latin fulminat- ‘struck by lightning’, from fulmen, fulmin- ‘lightning’. The earliest sense (derived from medieval Latin fulminare) was ‘denounce formally’, later ‘issue formal censures’ (originally said of the Pope). A sense ‘emit thunder and lightning’, based on the original Latin meaning, arose in the early 17th cent., and hence ‘explode violently’ (late 17th cent.).
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: fulminate