English

Definition of gather verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    gather

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈɡæðə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɡæðər//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they gather
    BrE BrE//ˈɡæðə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɡæðər//
     
    he / she / it gathers
    BrE BrE//ˈɡæðəz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɡæðərz//
     
    past simple gathered
    BrE BrE//ˈɡæðəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɡæðərd//
     
    past participle gathered
    BrE BrE//ˈɡæðəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɡæðərd//
     
    -ing form gathering
    BrE BrE//ˈɡæðərɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɡæðərɪŋ//
     
     
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    come/bring together
  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] to come together, or bring people together, in one place to form a group A crowd soon gathered. + adv./prep. His supporters gathered in the main square. Can you all gather round? I've got something to tell you. The whole family gathered together at Ray's home. be gathered + adv./prep. They were all gathered round the TV. A large crowd was gathered outside the studio. The kids were gathered together in one room.
  2. 2  [transitive] to bring things together that have been spread around gather something People slowly gathered their belongings and left the hall. gather something together/up I waited while he gathered up his papers. Synonymscollectgather accumulate amassThese words all mean to get more of something over a period of time, or to increase in quantity over a period of time.collect to bring things or information together from different people or places; to gradually increase in amount in a place:We’ve been collecting data from various sources. Dirt had collected in the corners of the room. People sometimes collect things of a particular type as a hobby:to collect stamps.gather to bring things together that have been spread around; to collect information from different sources:I waited while he gathered up his papers. Detectives have spent months gathering evidence.collect or gather?Both collect and gather can be used in the same way to talk about bringing together data, information or evidence. When talking about things, gather is used with words like things, belongings or papers when the things are spread around within a short distance. Collect is used for getting examples of something from different people or places that are physically separated.accumulate (rather formal) to gradually get more and more of something over a period of time; to gradually increase in number or quantity over a period of time:I seem to have accumulated a lot of books. Debts began to accumulate.amass (rather formal) to collect something in large quantities, especially money, debts or information:He amassed a fortune from silver mining.Patterns to collect/​gather/​accumulate/​amass data/​evidence/​information to accumulate/​amass a fortune/​debts dirt/​dust/​debris collects/​accumulates to gradually/​slowly collect/​gather/​accumulate (something)
  3. collect
  4. 3  [transitive] gather something to collect information from different sources Detectives have spent months gathering evidence. Synonymscollectgather accumulate amassThese words all mean to get more of something over a period of time, or to increase in quantity over a period of time.collect to bring things or information together from different people or places; to gradually increase in amount in a place:We’ve been collecting data from various sources. Dirt had collected in the corners of the room. People sometimes collect things of a particular type as a hobby:to collect stamps.gather to bring things together that have been spread around; to collect information from different sources:I waited while he gathered up his papers. Detectives have spent months gathering evidence.collect or gather?Both collect and gather can be used in the same way to talk about bringing together data, information or evidence. When talking about things, gather is used with words like things, belongings or papers when the things are spread around within a short distance. Collect is used for getting examples of something from different people or places that are physically separated.accumulate (rather formal) to gradually get more and more of something over a period of time; to gradually increase in number or quantity over a period of time:I seem to have accumulated a lot of books. Debts began to accumulate.amass (rather formal) to collect something in large quantities, especially money, debts or information:He amassed a fortune from silver mining.Patterns to collect/​gather/​accumulate/​amass data/​evidence/​information to accumulate/​amass a fortune/​debts dirt/​dust/​debris collects/​accumulates to gradually/​slowly collect/​gather/​accumulate (something)
  5. 4  [transitive] gather something to collect plants, fruit, etc. from a wide area to gather wild flowers
  6. crops/harvest
  7. 5[transitive] gather something (in) (formal or literary) to pick or cut and collect crops to be stored It was late August and the harvest had been safely gathered in.
  8. believe/understand
  9. 6[transitive, intransitive] (not used in the progressive tenses) to believe or understand that something is true because of information or evidence you have gather (that)… I gather (that) you wanted to see me. I gather from your letter that you're not enjoying your job. gather (something) ‘There's been a delay.’ ‘I gathered that.’ ‘She won't be coming.’ ‘So I gather.’ You're self-employed, I gather. As far as I can gather, he got involved in a fight. From what I can gather, there's been some kind of problem.
  10. increase
  11. 7[transitive] gather something to increase in speed, force, etc. The truck gathered speed. During the 1980s the green movement gathered momentum. Thousands of these machines are gathering dust (= not being used) in stockrooms.
  12. of clouds/darkness
  13. 8[intransitive] to gradually increase in number or amount The storm clouds were gathering. the gathering gloom of a winter’s afternoon
  14. clothing
  15. 9[transitive] to pull a piece of clothing tighter to your body gather something around you/something He gathered his cloak around him. gather something up She gathered up her skirts and ran.
  16. 10[transitive] gather something (in) to pull parts of a piece of clothing together in folds and sew them in place She wore a skirt gathered (in) at the waist.
  17. hold somebody
  18. 11[transitive] gather somebody + adv./prep. to pull somebody towards you and put your arms around them She gathered the child in her arms and held him close. He gathered her to him.
  19. prepare yourself
  20. 12[transitive] gather something/yourself to prepare yourself to do something that requires effort I sat down for a moment to gather my strength. She was still trying to gather her thoughts together when the door opened. Fortunately the short delay gave him time to gather himself. He paused to gather his breath.
  21. Word Origin Old English gaderian, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch gaderen, also to together.Extra examples As the weeks passed, Charlotte began to gather strength. He gathered her close and kissed her. He gathered her into his arms. She gathered the child to her. She hastily gathered all her belongings together. She was still trying to gather her thoughts when the door opened. The boys gathered around the car. The movement for reform rapidly gathered momentum. They are all gathering for a major conference. ‘She won’t be coming.’ ‘I gathered that.’ ‘There’s been a delay.’ ‘So I gather.’ As far as I can gather, he got involved in a fight. Can you all gather round? I’ve got something to tell you. From what they could gather, there had been some kind of problem back at the base. I gather from your letter that you’re not enjoying your job. I gather you wanted to see me. She gathered her things together and got to her feet. The whole family gathered together at Ray’s home. They lived in the forest, gathering mushrooms and berries to eat.Idioms
    a rolling stone gathers no moss
     
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    (saying) a person who moves from place to place, job to job, etc. does not have a lot of money, possessions or friends but is free from responsibilities
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: gather