Definition of heat noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    heat

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//hiːt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//hiːt//
     
    Athletics, Energy and physical forces
     
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    being hot/temperature
  1. 1  [uncountable, singular] the quality of being hot He could feel the heat of the sun on his back. Heat rises. The fire gave out a fierce heat. see also white heat See related entries: Energy and physical forces
  2. 2  [uncountable, countable, usually singular] the level of temperature to increase/reduce the heat Test the heat of the water before getting in. Set the oven to a low/high/moderate heat. see also blood heat
  3. 3  [uncountable] hot weather; the hot conditions in a building/vehicle, etc. You should not go out in the heat of the day (= at the hottest time). to suffer from the heat the afternoon/midday heat The heat in the factory was unbearable. see also prickly heat
  4. for cooking
  5. 4  [uncountable] a source of heat, especially one that you cook food on Return the pan to the heat and stir. Simmer the soup for 10 minutes then remove from the heat.
  6. in building/room
  7. 5  [uncountable] (especially North American English) = heating The heat wasn't on and the house was freezing.
  8. strong feelings
  9. 6[uncountable] strong feelings, especially of anger or excitement ‘No, I won't,’ he said with heat in his voice. The chairman tried to take the heat out of the situation (= to make people calmer). In the heat of the moment she forgot what she wanted to say (= because she was so angry or excited). In the heat of the argument he said a lot of things he regretted later.
  10. pressure
  11. 7[uncountable] pressure on somebody to do or achieve something The heat is on now that the election is only a week away. United turned up the heat on their opponents with a second goal. Can she take the heat of this level of competition?
  12. race
  13. 8[countable] one of a series of races or competitions, the winners of which then compete against each other in the next part of the competition a qualifying heat She won her heat. He did well in the heats; hopefully he'll do as well in the final. see also dead heat See related entries: Athletics
  14. Word Origin Old English hǣtu (noun), hǣtan (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch hitte (noun) and German heizen (verb), also to hot.Extra examples ‘It was your idea,’ Henry said with heat. A heat haze shimmered above the fields. Andy had the heat on full blast in the car. Aston Villa turned up the heat on their opponents with a second goal. Being a metal, aluminium readily conducts heat. Bring to the boil slowly, then remove from the heat. Chocolate should never be melted over direct heat. Competition was fierce, with a dead heat in one of the races. Computers and photocopiers all generate heat of their own. Cook on a low heat for five minutes. Daily the heat grew. Darker surfaces absorb heat. Even after the sun had set, the stones continued to give out heat. Everything he did was at white heat and lightning speed. He fell in the first heat. He stared at her, sudden heat in his eyes. He tried to ignore the heat building up in the confined space. Heat flooded her cheeks. I can’t work in this heat. I could feel the heat coming from the fire. I think the heat is getting to all of us. I turned the heat down several notches. If circulation is impaired, the body cannot lose excess heat. Make sure the pan is off the heat. Michael bitterly regretted those angry words, spoken in the heat of the moment. Our heat goes off at ten o’clock and comes on again at six. She slumped to the ground suffering from heat exhaustion. She spoke without heat. Simmer the sauce over a gentle heat. The heat is on now that the election is only a week away. The heat was on but the window was open. The heat’s on low. The house has electric heat. The soil is baked dry by the fierce heat of the sun. The thick walls retain the heat. These industries provide heat for our homes and fuel for our cars. They are afraid to turn the heat on because it’s so expensive. They have their heat turned off during the morning. To avoid the heat of the day we went out in the mornings. Towards the end of the cooking, turn up the heat to brown the outside. Turn up the heat to caramelize the sugar. We walked more than ten miles in the blistering heat. a material which can withstand heats of up to 2 000°C in the heat of battle/​passion the heat from the fire the steamy heat of New York in summer ‘No, I won’t,’ he said with heat in his voice. He did well in the heats ; hopefully he’ll do as well in the final. In the heat of the argument he said a lot of things he regretted later. In the heat of the moment she forgot what she wanted to say. It’s important to switch off heat and light in unoccupied rooms. Products which may be damaged by heat are stored in a separate area. Sadly, he went out in the qualifying heat. The air shimmered in the midday heat. The chairman tried to take the heat out of the situation. The heat wasn’t on and the house was freezing. We avoided going out in the heat of the day.Idioms
    be on heat(British English)(North American English be in heat)
     
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    (of a female mammal) to be in a sexual condition ready to reproduce
    if you can’t stand the heat (get out of the kitchen)
     
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    (informal) used to tell somebody to stop trying to do something if they find it too difficult, especially in order to suggest that they are less able than other people
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: heat