Definition of honourable adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    honourable

     adjective
    (especially US English honorable)adjective
    BrE BrE//ˈɒnərəbl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɑːnərəbl//
     
    Moral
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1deserving respect and admiration a long and honourable career in government They managed an honourable 2–2 draw. With a few honourable exceptions, the staff were found to be incompetent.
  2. 2showing high moral standards an honourable man See related entries: Moral
  3. 3allowing somebody to keep their good name and the respect of others an honourable compromise They urged her to do the honourable thing and resign. He received an honourable discharge from the army. opposite dishonourable
  4. 4the Honourable (abbreviation Hon) [only before noun] (in Britain) a title used by a child of some ranks of the nobility Culture In Britain the title the Honourable is used for the children of barons and viscounts and the daughters and younger sons of earls.
  5. 5the/my Honourable… (abbreviation Hon) [only before noun] (in Britain), a title used by Members of Parliament when talking about or to another Member during a debate If my Honourable Friend would give me a chance to answer,… Would the Honourable Member agree that…?
  6. 6(abbreviation Hon) a title of respect used by an official of high rank the Honorable Alan Simpson, US senator Culture a title of respect used before the names of certain important officials in the US, but not when speaking to them. They include members of Congress, the US Attorney General, members of the Supreme Court, other judges, members of the President's Cabinet, US ambassadors, state governors and mayors.
  7. compare Right Honourable Use an, not a, before honourable.
    Word Origin Middle English: via Old French from Latin honorabilis, from honor ‘honour’.Extra examples My intentions were perfectly honourable. a very honourable man He was an honourable man who could not lie. I’m sure she’s honourable enough, but does that mean she’s the best person to negotiate? She had a long and honourable career in government. The only honourable thing to do is to resign. The team managed an honourable 2–2 draw. With a few honourable exceptions, most of the staff were found to be incompetent.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: honourable