Definition of hop verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    hop

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//hɒp//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//hɑːp//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they hop
    BrE BrE//hɒp//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//hɑːp//
     
    he / she / it hops
    BrE BrE//hɒps//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//hɑːps//
     
    past simple hopped
    BrE BrE//hɒpt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//hɑːpt//
     
    past participle hopped
    BrE BrE//hɒpt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//hɑːpt//
     
    -ing form hopping
    BrE BrE//ˈhɒpɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈhɑːpɪŋ//
     
    Train and bus travel
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) (of a person) to move by jumping on one foot I couldn't put my weight on my ankle and had to hop everywhere. kids hopping over puddles He was hopping from foot to foot.
  2. 2[intransitive] + adv./prep. (of an animal or a bird) to move by jumping with all or both feet together A robin was hopping around on the path. The frog hopped towards him.
  3. 3[intransitive] + adv./prep. (informal) to go or move somewhere quickly and suddenly Hop in, I'll drive you home. She hopped out of the car at the traffic lights. to hop into/out of bed I hopped on the next train. We hopped over to Paris for the weekend.
  4. 4[transitive] hop a plane, bus, train, etc. (North American English) to get on a plane, bus, etc. See related entries: Train and bus travel
  5. 5[intransitive] hop (from something to something) to change from one activity or subject to another I like to hop from channel to channel when I watch TV. She’s always hopping from one project to the next.
  6. Word Originverb Old English hoppian, of Germanic origin; related to German dialect hopfen and German hopsen.Extra examples He hopped up and down impatiently. She waited by the car, hopping from foot to foot to keep warm. birds hopping around on the grass He hopped painfully from foot to foot. Hop in. I’ll drive you home. I couldn’t put any weight on my ankle and had to hop everywhere. I dumped my bags at a motel and hopped a cab to the outskirts of town. I hopped a plane for New York. I hopped on the next bus. The little girl hopped and skipped along the lane.Idioms (old-fashioned, British English, informal) usually used in orders to tell somebody to go away synonym go away Go on, hop it! He hopped it out of the window. (North American English, informal) = jump to it
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: hop