English

Definition of hurtle verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

hurtle

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈhɜːtl//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhɜːrtl//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they hurtle
BrE BrE//ˈhɜːtl//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhɜːrtl//
 
he / she / it hurtles
BrE BrE//ˈhɜːtlz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhɜːrtlz//
 
past simple hurtled
BrE BrE//ˈhɜːtld//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhɜːrtld//
 
past participle hurtled
BrE BrE//ˈhɜːtld//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhɜːrtld//
 
-ing form hurtling
BrE BrE//ˈhɜːtlɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhɜːrtlɪŋ//
 
 
jump to other results
[intransitive] + adv./prep. to move very fast in a particular direction A runaway car came hurtling towards us. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘strike against, collide with’): frequentative of hurt.Extra examples He grabbed the gun and sent it hurtling across the room. hurtling along in a sports car A train came hurtling through the station. He was hurtling along in his brand new car. Overbalancing, she hurtled forward down the stairs. Two ambulances hurtled towards the scene.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: hurtle