English

Definition of impeach verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    impeach

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpiːtʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpiːtʃ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they impeach
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpiːtʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpiːtʃ//
     
    he / she / it impeaches
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpiːtʃɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpiːtʃɪz//
     
    past simple impeached
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpiːtʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpiːtʃt//
     
    past participle impeached
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpiːtʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpiːtʃt//
     
    -ing form impeaching
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpiːtʃɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpiːtʃɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1impeach somebody (for something) (of a court or other official body, especially in the US) to charge an important public figure with a serious crime The President was impeached by Congress for lying. Culture In the US impeachment is the procedure by which a public official, including the President, is charged with acting illegally and may be forced to leave the job. President Richard Nixon resigned after the House Judiciary Committee recommended that he should be impeached for the crime of Watergate. Only two presidents have been officially impeached. The first was Andrew Johnson in 1868, who remained as President because the US Senate decided by one vote that he should do so. The second was Bill Clinton in 1999, who was then judged not guilty of acting illegally.
  2. 2impeach something (formal) to raise doubts about something synonym question to impeach somebody’s motives
  3. Word Origin late Middle English (also in the sense ‘hinder, prevent’; earlier as empeche): from Old French empecher ‘impede’, from late Latin impedicare ‘catch, entangle’ (based on pedica ‘a fetter’, from pes, ped- ‘foot’). Compare with impede.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: impeach