Definition of impression noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    impression

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpreʃn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpreʃn//
     
     
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    idea/opinion
  1. 1  an idea, a feeling or an opinion that you get about somebody/something, or that somebody/something gives you a general/an overall impression an initial/a lasting impression impression (of somebody/something) to get a good/bad impression of somebody/something My first impression of him was favourable. She gives the impression of being very busy. impression (that…) I did not get the impression that they were unhappy about the situation. My impression is that there are still a lot of problems. Try and smile. You don't want to give people the wrong impression (= that you are not friendly).
  2. effect
  3. 2  the effect that an experience or a person has on somebody/something a big impression impression (on somebody) His trip to India made a strong impression on him. My words made no impression on her. You'll have to play better than that if you really want to make an impression (= to make people admire you).
  4. drawing
  5. 3a drawing showing what a person looks like or what a place or a building will look like in the future This is an artist's impression of the new stadium.
  6. amusing copy of somebody
  7. 4impression (of somebody) an amusing copy of the way a person acts or speaks synonym impersonation He did an impression of Tom Hanks.
  8. false appearance
  9. 5an appearance that may be false Clever lighting creates an impression of space in a room.
  10. mark
  11. 6a mark that is left when an object is pressed hard into a surface The dentist made an impression of his teeth.
  12. book
  13. 7all the copies of a book that are printed at one time, with few or no changes to the contents since the last time the book was printed compare edition
  14. Word Origin late Middle English: via Old French from Latin impressio(n-), from impress- ‘pressed in’, from the verb imprimere, from in- ‘into’ + premere ‘to press’.Extra examples Her performance did little to change my impression of her. I got the distinct impression that you disliked her. I had the wrong impression about him. I must correct a false impression that I gave you just now. I was under the impression that you weren’t coming until tomorrow. If you want to create the right impression, I suggest you wear a suit. It was difficult to avoid the impression that he was assisting them for selfish reasons. She was trying to maintain the impression that she was in control. The book leaves you with a distorted impression of politics. The day’s events left a lasting impression on them. The model gives a good impression of what the building will look like. The new player failed to make an immediate impression on the team. The police have issued an artist’s impression of the attacker. The sealing wax bore the impression of a sailing ship. The village gives a good impression of what a medieval city would have looked like. There is a widespread impression that schooling needs to be improved. His visit to India made a strong impression on him. I don’t think this argument made any impression upon the brothers. I get the impression there are still a lot of problems. I’m afraid I got a rather bad impression of her. She did her Marilyn Monroe impression. The events left an indelible impression on all those who witnessed them. The overall impression was good. The stillness and silence leave a deep impression on visitors. This is an artist’s impression of the new stadium. Try and smile. You don’t want to give people the wrong impression. You’ll have to play better than that if you really want to make an impression.Idioms
    (be) under the impression that…
     
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    believing, usually wrongly, that something is true or is happening I was under the impression that the work had already been completed. The soldiers scattered, under the impression that it was an enemy attack. Synonymsthinkbelieve feel reckon be under the impressionThese words all mean to have an idea that something is true or possible or to have a particular opinion about somebody/​something.think to have an idea that something is true or possible, although you are not completely certain; to have a particular opinion about somebody/​something:Do you think (that) they’ll come? Well, I like it. What do you think?believe to have an idea that something is true or possible, although you are not completely certain; to have a particular opinion about somebody/​something:Police believe (that) the man may be armed.think or believe?When you are expressing an idea that you have or that somebody has of what is true or possible, believe is more formal than think. It is used especially for talking about ideas that other people have; think is used more often for talking about your own ideas:Police believe… I think… When you are expressing an opinion, believe is stronger than think and is used especially for matters of principle; think is used more for practical matters or matters of personal taste.feel to have a particular opinion about something that has happened or about what you/​somebody ought to do:We all felt (that) we were unlucky to lose.reckon (informal) to think that something is true or possible:I reckon (that) I’m going to get that job.be under the impression that… to have an idea that something is true:I was under the impression that the work had already been completed.Patterns to think/​believe/​feel/​reckon/​be under the impression that… It is thought/​believed/​reckoned that… to be thought/​believed/​felt/​reckoned to be something to think/​believe/​feel something about somebody/​something to sincerely/​honestly/​seriously/​mistakenly think/​believe/​feel
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: impression