Definition of inclusive adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    inclusive

     adjective
    adjective
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkluːsɪv//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkluːsɪv//
     
     
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  1. 1having the total cost, or the cost of something that is mentioned, contained in the price The fully inclusive fare for the trip is £52. inclusive of something The rent is inclusive of water and heating. opposite exclusive
  2. 2(from)… to… inclusive (British English) including all the days, months, numbers, etc. mentioned We are offering free holidays for children aged two to eleven inclusive. The castle is open daily from May to October inclusive. British/​Americaninclusive / through In British English, inclusive is used to emphasize that you are including the days, months, numbers, etc. mentioned, especially in formal or official situations:Answer questions 8 to 12 inclusive. The amusement park is open daily from May to October inclusive. In North American English, through is used:Answer questions 8 through 12. The amusement park is open (from) May through October. To can also be used with this meaning in British English and North American English:The park is open from 1 May to 31 October.
  3. 3including a wide range of people, things, ideas, etc. The party must adopt more inclusive strategies and a broader vision. opposite exclusive
  4. Word Origin late 16th cent.: from medieval Latin inclusivus, from Latin includere ‘shut in’, from in- ‘into’ + claudere ‘to shut’.Extra examples The government wants communities which are socially inclusive. The price is all inclusive. The system has become more inclusive. We need to reach out as much as possible to make this a truly inclusive organization. a fully inclusive price The fully inclusive fare for the trip is £320. These services offer inclusive insurance cover of up to $5 000.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: inclusive

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