Definition of informed adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

informed

 adjective
adjective
BrE BrE//ɪnˈfɔːmd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈfɔːrmd//
 
 
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having or showing a lot of knowledge about a particular subject or situation an informed critic an informed choice/decision/guess/opinion They are not fully informed about the changes. Keep me informed of any developments. opposite uninformed see also ill-informed, well informedExtra examples I am reliably informed that there are plans to close this school. I offer my observations as those of an interested and reasonably informed member of the general public. Keep me informed on progress. The kids are much better informed than I was at their age. They were poorly informed about their rights. We will keep you informed of any developments. a politically informed public theoretically informed research A free media is essential for an informed democracy. He went against all informed advice. I wasn’t sure how he came to be so well informed. Informed sources say that the president may have received hospital treatment last year. It was a serious and informed debate. Make sure you’re well informed about health hazards. The discussion was about whether the child was old enough to make an informed decision. The newspaper’s readership is generally well informed and intelligent. We try to enable people to make informed choices about what car to buy. We’re not sure what really happened, but we can make an informed guess.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: informed