Definition of insinuate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    insinuate

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈsɪnjueɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈsɪnjueɪt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they insinuate
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈsɪnjueɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈsɪnjueɪt//
     
    he / she / it insinuates
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈsɪnjueɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈsɪnjueɪts//
     
    past simple insinuated
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈsɪnjueɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈsɪnjueɪtɪd//
     
    past participle insinuated
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈsɪnjueɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈsɪnjueɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form insinuating
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈsɪnjueɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈsɪnjueɪtɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1to suggest indirectly that something unpleasant is true synonym imply insinuate that… The article insinuated that he was having an affair with his friend's wife. insinuate something What are you trying to insinuate? an insinuating smile
  2. 2insinuate yourself into something (formal, disapproving) to succeed in gaining somebody’s respect, affection, etc. so that you can use the situation to your own advantage In the first act, the villain insinuates himself into the household of the man he intends to kill.
  3. 3insinuate yourself/something + adv./prep. (formal) to slowly move yourself or a part of your body into a particular position or place She insinuated her right hand under his arm.
  4. Word Origin early 16th cent. (in the sense ‘enter (a document) on the official register’): from Latin insinuat- ‘introduced tortuously’, from the verb insinuare, from in- ‘in’ + sinuare ‘to curve’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: insinuate