Definition of intend verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    intend

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtend//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtend//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they intend
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtend//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtend//
     
    he / she / it intends
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtendz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtendz//
     
    past simple intended
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtendɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtendɪd//
     
    past participle intended
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtendɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtendɪd//
     
    -ing form intending
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtendɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtendɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] to have a plan, result or purpose in your mind when you do something We finished later than we had intended. intend to do something I fully intended (= definitely intended) to pay for the damage. intend somebody/something to do something The writer clearly intends his readers to identify with the main character. intend doing something (British English) I don't intend staying long. intend something The company intends a slow-down in expansion. intend somebody something He intended her no harm (= it was not his plan to harm her). it is intended that… It is intended that production will start next month. intend that… We intend that production will start next month. More Like This Verbs usually followed by infinitives afford, agree, appear, arrange, attempt, beg, choose, consent, decide, expect, fail, happen, hesitate, hope, intend, learn, manage, mean, neglect, offer, prepare, pretend, promise, refuse, swear, try, want, wishSee worksheet.
  2. 2  [transitive] (rather formal) to plan that something should have a particular meaning synonym mean intend something (by something) What exactly did you intend by that remark? intend something (as something) He intended it as a joke.
  3. Word Familyintend verbintended adjective (unintended)intention nounintentional adjective (unintentional)intentionally adverb (unintentionally) Word Origin Middle English entend (in the sense ‘direct the attention to’), from Old French entendre, from Latin intendere ‘intend, extend, direct’, from in- ‘towards’ + tendere ‘stretch, tend’.Extra examples I never intended to hurt you. It was thought that the bomb might have been intended for a visiting MP. She fully intends to continue her sporting career once she has recovered from her injuries. The bomb was probably intended for a well-known human rights campaigner. He intended her no harm. He intends to retire at the end of this year. I don’t intend staying long. I don’t intend to make the same mistake again. I fully intended to pay for the damage. It is intended that production will start at the end of the month. She didn’t intend to kill him. They stayed much longer than they’d originally intended. We finished later than intended. What do you intend to do now?
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: intend