Definition of intimidate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

intimidate

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they intimidate
BrE BrE//ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪt//
 
he / she / it intimidates
BrE BrE//ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪts//
 
past simple intimidated
BrE BrE//ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪtɪd//
 
past participle intimidated
BrE BrE//ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪtɪd//
 
-ing form intimidating
BrE BrE//ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪtɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪtɪŋ//
 
 
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intimidate somebody (into something/into doing something) to frighten or threaten somebody so that they will do what you want They were accused of intimidating people into voting for them. She refused to be intimidated by their threats. Word Origin mid 17th cent.: from medieval Latin intimidat- ‘made timid’, from the verb intimidare (based on timidus ‘timid’).Extra examples He was not a man to be easily intimidated. She did not feel intimidated by him. The police had tried to intimidate him into signing a confession. Buildings were set on fire in an attempt to intimidate our members.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: intimidate