Definition of intrude verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    intrude

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtruːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtruːd//
     
    (formal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they intrude
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtruːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtruːd//
     
    he / she / it intrudes
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtruːdz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtruːdz//
     
    past simple intruded
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtruːdɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtruːdɪd//
     
    past participle intruded
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtruːdɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtruːdɪd//
     
    -ing form intruding
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtruːdɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtruːdɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] to go or be somewhere where you are not wanted or are not supposed to be I'm sorry to intrude, but I need to talk to someone. intrude into/on/upon somebody/something legislation to stop newspapers from intruding on people’s private lives
  2. 2[intransitive] intrude (on/into/upon something) to disturb something or have an unpleasant effect on it The sound of the telephone intruded into his dreams.
  3. Word Origin mid 16th cent. (in the sense ‘usurp an office or right’; originally as entrude): from Latin intrudere, from in- ‘into’ + trudere ‘to thrust’.Extra examples His father’s image had begun to intrude on his consciousness at odd moments. Personal, subjective elements should not be allowed to intrude. Sorry to intrude, but I need to talk to someone. They must be prevented from intruding into the family’s private grief. We need legislation to stop newspapers from intruding on people’s private lives. We should not intrude upon their private grief.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: intrude