Definition of invest verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    invest

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvest//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvest//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they invest
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvest//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvest//
     
    he / she / it invests
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvests//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvests//
     
    past simple invested
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvestɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvestɪd//
     
    past participle invested
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvestɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvestɪd//
     
    -ing form investing
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvestɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvestɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] to buy property, shares in a company, etc. in the hope of making a profit invest (in something) Now is a good time to invest in the property market. invest something (in something) He invested his life savings in his daughter's business. Wordfinderafford, bank, bankrupt, capital, , expense, , invest, money, profit Wordfinderasset, bond, capital, dividend, equity, fund, interest, invest, portfolio, share
  2. 2  [intransitive, transitive] (of an organization or government, etc.) to spend money on something in order to make it better or more successful invest (in/on something) The government has invested heavily in public transport. invest something (in/on something) The college is to invest $2 million in a new conference hall. In his time managing the club he has invested millions on new players.
  3. 3[transitive] invest something (in something) invest something (in) doing something to spend time, energy, effort, etc. on something that you think is good or useful She had invested all her adult life in the relationship.
  4. 4[transitive] (formal) to give somebody power or authority, especially as part of their job invest somebody (with something) The new position invested her with a good deal of responsibility. invest somebody (as something) The interview was broadcast on the same day he was invested as President. see also investiture
  5. Word Origin mid 16th cent. (in the senses ‘clothe’, ‘clothe with the insignia of a rank’, and ‘endow with authority’): from French investir or Latin investire, from in- ‘into, upon’ + vestire ‘clothe’ (from vestis ‘clothing’). Senses (1) and (2) (early 17th cent.) are influenced by Italian investire.Extra examples Are you willing to invest the time and effort necessary to make the scheme work? He personally invested $980 000 in the company. Her savings are invested with a building society. If you invest directly in the stock market potential profits are greater, but so are potential losses. The company invested heavily in new technology. The industry has failed to invest in new product development. We can invest your money tax-free abroad. When exchange controls were lifted Swedes rushed to invest abroad. You need to think about investing for your retirement. encouragement to invest in pension plans investors looking to invest in US companies He invested his life savings in his daughter’s business. Most of her money is invested overseas. The college has invested $2 million on a new gymnasium. Phrasal Verbsinˈvest in somethinginˈvest somebody with something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: invest

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