English

Definition of jockey verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

jockey

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈdʒɒki//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒɑːki//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they jockey
BrE BrE//ˈdʒɒki//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒɑːki//
 
he / she / it jockeys
BrE BrE//ˈdʒɒkiz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒɑːkiz//
 
past simple jockeyed
BrE BrE//ˈdʒɒkid//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒɑːkid//
 
past participle jockeyed
BrE BrE//ˈdʒɒkid//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒɑːkid//
 
-ing form jockeying
BrE BrE//ˈdʒɒkiɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒɑːkiɪŋ//
 
 
jump to other results
[intransitive] jockey (with somebody) (for something) | jockey (with somebody) (to do something) to try all possible ways of gaining an advantage over other people The runners jockeyed for position at the start. The bands are constantly jockeying with each other for the number one spot. Several key figures are already jockeying to succeed the leader. The firms often adopt quite different strategies as they jockey for position. Word Origin late 16th cent.: diminutive of Jock. Originally the name for an ordinary man, lad, or underling, the word came to mean ‘mounted courier’, hence the current sense (late 17th cent.). Another early use ‘horse-dealer’ (which was symbolic of dishonesty) probably gave rise to the verb sense ‘manipulate’, whereas the main verb sense probably relates to the behaviour of jockeys manoeuvring for an advantageous position during a race.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: jockey