Definition of juggle verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    juggle

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈdʒʌɡl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒʌɡl//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they juggle
    BrE BrE//ˈdʒʌɡl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒʌɡl//
     
    he / she / it juggles
    BrE BrE//ˈdʒʌɡlz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒʌɡlz//
     
    past simple juggled
    BrE BrE//ˈdʒʌɡld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒʌɡld//
     
    past participle juggled
    BrE BrE//ˈdʒʌɡld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒʌɡld//
     
    -ing form juggling
    BrE BrE//ˈdʒʌɡlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒʌɡlɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] to throw a set of three or more objects such as balls into the air and catch and throw them again quickly, one at a time My uncle taught me to juggle. juggle with something to juggle with balls juggle something (figurative) I was juggling books, shopping bags and the baby (= I was trying to hold them all without dropping them).
  2. 2[transitive, intransitive] juggle (something) (with something) to try to deal with two or more important jobs or activities at the same time so that you can fit all of them into your life Working mothers are used to juggling their jobs, their children's needs and their housework. I’m sure I can juggle things around to fit you in.
  3. 3[transitive] juggle something to organize information, figures, the money you spend, etc. in the most useful or effective way
  4. Word Origin late Middle English (in the sense ‘entertain with jesting, tricks, etc.’): back-formation from juggler, or from Old French jogler, from Latin joculari ‘to jest’, from joculus, diminutive of jocus ‘jest’. Current senses date from the late 19th cent.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: juggle