Definition of kick verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    kick

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kɪk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kɪk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they kick
    BrE BrE//kɪk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kɪk//
     
    he / she / it kicks
    BrE BrE//kɪks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kɪks//
     
    past simple kicked
    BrE BrE//kɪkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kɪkt//
     
    past participle kicked
    BrE BrE//kɪkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kɪkt//
     
    -ing form kicking
    BrE BrE//ˈkɪkɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɪkɪŋ//
     
    Soccer
     
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  1. 1  [transitive, intransitive] to hit somebody/something with your foot kick (somebody/something) She was punched and kicked by her attackers. Stop kicking—it hurts! kick somebody/something + adv./prep./adj. The boys were kicking a ball around in the yard. Vandals had kicked the door down.
  2. 2  [transitive, intransitive] kick (something) to move your legs as if you were kicking something The dancers kicked their legs in the air. The child was dragged away, kicking and screaming.
  3. 3[transitive] kick yourself (informal) to be annoyed with yourself because you have done something stupid, missed an opportunity, etc. He'll kick himself when he finds out he could have had the job.
  4. 4[transitive] kick something (in sports such as football (soccer ) and rugby) to score points by kicking the ball to kick a penalty/goal See related entries: Soccer
  5. Word Origin late Middle English: of unknown origin.Extra examples Abe roared and kicked over a table. Don’t kick the ball too hard. Foster admitted punching and kicking the man repeatedly. He had been smoking for fifteen years and wanted to kick the habit. He rolled over in the sand, kicking wildly. He was sent off for deliberately kicking an Italian player. I could kick myself for being so stupid. I mentally kicked myself for missing such an opportunity. I tried to dive back under, kicking with my legs. I was carried upstairs, arms waving and legs kicking. Marcia gently kicked the horse again to make it trot. She could feel the baby kicking against her stomach wall. She kicked at the loose pebbles by the roadside. She kicked me on the knee. Suddenly the far door was kicked open. The horse kicked out at the dog. The little boy was now lying on his back kicking his legs in the air. The police had to drag her kicking and screaming out of the house. They dropped their bags in the front hall and kicked off their shoes. They threw him to the ground and kicked him hard in the stomach. Young people often kick against convention.Idioms very active, healthy or popular See related entries: Good health
    beat/kick (the) hell out of somebody/something, knock hell out of somebody/something
     
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    (informal) to hit somebody/something very hard He was a dirty player and loved to kick hell out of the opposition.
      kick (some) ass/butt(slang, especially North American English)
       
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    1. 1to act in a way that is aggressive or full of energy
    2. 2to succeed or win in an impressive way
    kick (some/somebody’s) ass
     
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    to punish or defeat somebody
    (informal or humorous) to die
    kick the habit, drug, booze, etc.
     
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    to stop doing something harmful that you have done for a long time
    (British English) to have nothing to do while you are waiting for somebody/something We were kicking our heels, waiting for some customers.
    kick somebody in the teeth
     
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    to treat somebody badly or fail to give them help when they need it
    kick something into the long grass/into touch
     
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    (British English) to reject, remove or stop dealing with a problem He tends to deal with disputes by kicking them into the long grass.
    (old-fashioned, British English) to start to behave badly and refuse to accept any discipline or control
    kick the tyres(North American English kick the tires)
     
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    to test the quality of something to see whether it is suitable for you before you buy it
    kick up a fuss, stink, etc.
     
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    (informal) to complain loudly about something They’ll usually give you your money back if you threaten to kick up a stink.
    (informal, especially North American English) to be relaxed and enjoy yourself (informal) to move somebody to a job that seems to be more important but which actually has less power or influence
    kick somebody when they’re down
     
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    to continue to hurt somebody when they are already defeated, etc.
    Phrasal Verbskick aboutkick something aboutkick against somethingkick somebody aroundkick backkick inkick offkick off (with something)kick somethingoffkick off somethingkick outkick somebody out (of something)kick upkick somethingup
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: kick