Definition of knot noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    knot

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//nɒt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//nɑːt//
     
    Describing hair
     
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    in string/rope
  1. 1  a join made by tying together two pieces or ends of string, rope, etc. to tie a knot Tie the two ropes together with a knot. Tie a knot in the rope. (figurative) hair full of knots and tangles (= twisted in a way that is difficult to comb) a tangled knot of arms and legs Sailors had to know lots of different knots.
  2. of hair
  3. 2a way of twisting hair into a small round shape at the back of the head She had her hair in a knot. See related entries: Describing hair
  4. in wood
  5. 3a hard round spot in a piece of wood where there was once a branch
  6. group of people
  7. 4a small group of people standing close together Little knots of people had gathered at the entrance.
  8. of muscles
  9. 5a tight, hard feeling in the stomach, throat, etc. caused by nerves, anger, etc. My stomach was in knots. I could feel a knot of fear in my throat.
  10. speed of boat/plane
  11. 6a unit for measuring the speed of boats and aircraft; one nautical mile per hour
  12. More Like This Silent letters gnarled, gnash, gnat, gnaw, gnome haute cuisine, heir, (NAmE herb), honour, hors d’oeuvre, hour knack, knee, kneel, knife, knight, knit, knob, knock, knot, know, knuckle psalm, psephology, psychic, ptarmigan, pterodactyl, psychology wrangle, wrap, wreath, wreck, wrench, wrestle, wriggle, wring, write, wrong bomb, climb, crumb, doubt, lamb, limb ascent, fascinate, muscle, scene, scissors height, right, sleigh, weight align, campaign, design, foreign, malign, reign, unfeigned balmy, calm, calf, half, yolk autumn, column, condemn, damn, hymn, solemn bristle, fasten, listen, mortgage, soften, thistle, wrestle biscuit, build, circuit, disguise, guilty, league, rogue, vague yacht answer, sword, twoSee worksheet. Word Origin Old English cnotta, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch knot.Idioms (British English, informal) very quickly She's getting through her winnings at a rate of knots.
    tie somebody/yourself (up) in knots
     
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    to become or make somebody very confused I got myself tied up in knots when I tried to explain the legal system to them.
    tie the knottie the knotmarry
     
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    (informal) to get married
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: knot