English

Definition of last verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    last1

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//lɑːst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//læst//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they last
    BrE BrE//lɑːst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//læst//
     
    he / she / it lasts
    BrE BrE//lɑːsts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//læsts//
     
    past simple lasted
    BrE BrE//ˈlɑːstɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈlæstɪd//
     
    past participle lasted
    BrE BrE//ˈlɑːstɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈlæstɪd//
     
    -ing form lasting
    BrE BrE//ˈlɑːstɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈlæstɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive] (not used in the progressive tenses) to continue for a particular period of time The meeting only lasted (for) a few minutes. Each game lasts about an hour. How long does the play last?
  2. 2  [intransitive, transitive] to continue to exist or to function well This weather won't last. He's making a big effort now, and I hope it lasts. last somebody These shoes should last you till next year.
  3. 3  [intransitive, transitive] to survive something or manage to stay in the same situation, despite difficulties She won't last long in that job. last (out) Can you last (out) until I can get help? last (out) something Doctors say that she probably won't last out the night (= she will probably die before the morning). He was injured early on and didn't last the match.
  4. 4  [intransitive, transitive] to be enough for somebody to use, especially for a particular period of time last (out) Will the coffee last out till next week? last somebody (out) We’ve got enough food to last us (for) three days. Which Word?last / takeLast and take are both used to talk about the length of time that something continues. Last is used to talk about the length of time that an event continues:How long do you think this storm will last? The movie lasted over two hours. Last does not always need an expression of time:His annoyance won’t last. Last is also used to say that you have enough of something:We don’t have enough money to last until next month. Take is used to talk about the amount of time you need in order to go somewhere or do something. It must be used with an expression of time:It takes (me) at least an hour to get home from work. How long will the flight take? The water took ages to boil.
  5. Word Originverb Old English lǣstan, of Germanic origin, related to German leisten ‘afford, yield’, also to last2Extra examples Even when cut, the flowers last very well. Happiness never lasts. I always thought his popularity was unlikely to last. Interest rates are at their lowest level for a decade. I suggest you enjoy it while it lasts. Make the most of this feeling while it lasts. Nothing lasts forever. She hoped they had enough firewood to last through the night. The celebrations lasted well into the next week. The effort began in November and lasted through February. The flight seemed to last forever. The good weather couldn’t last. The kids are all very enthusiastic, but it won’t last—it never does. The storm could last quite a long time. The trial is expected to last until the end of the week. The war lasted for three years. This house was built to last. This type of happiness rarely lasts. With care, the vines will last indefinitely. Your car will last longer if you look after it. a bruise that was sure to last for days Each game lasts (for) about an hour. He’s making a big effort now, and I hope it lasts. The meeting only lasted a few minutes. This weather won’t last.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: last