English

Definition of laugh verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    laugh

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//lɑːf//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//læf//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they laugh
    BrE BrE//lɑːf//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//læf//
     
    he / she / it laughs
    BrE BrE//lɑːfs//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//læfs//
     
    past simple laughed
    BrE BrE//lɑːft//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//læft//
     
    past participle laughed
    BrE BrE//lɑːft//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//læft//
     
    -ing form laughing
    BrE BrE//ˈlɑːfɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈlæfɪŋ//
     
    Happiness
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] to make the sounds and movements of your face that show you are happy or think something is funny to laugh loudly/aloud/out loud laugh (at/about something) You never laugh at my jokes! The show was hilarious—I couldn't stop laughing. She always makes me laugh. He burst out laughing (= suddenly started laughing). She laughed to cover her nervousness. I told him I was worried but he laughed scornfully. + speech ‘You're crazy!’ she laughed. Vocabulary BuildingDifferent ways of laughing cackle to laugh in a loud, unpleasant way, especially in a high voice chuckle to laugh quietly, especially because you are thinking about something funny giggle to laugh in a silly way because you are amused, embarrassed or nervous guffaw to laugh noisily roar to laugh very loudly snigger/snicker to laugh in a quiet unpleasant way, especially at something rude or at someone’s problems or mistakes titter to laugh quietly, especially in a nervous or embarrassed wayYou can also be convulsed with laughter or dissolve into laughter when you find something very funny. In British English people also shriek with laughter or howl with laughter. See related entries: Happiness
  2. 2[intransitive] be laughing (informal) used to say that you are in a very good position, especially because you have done something successfully If we win the next game we'll be laughing.
  3. Word Origin Old English hlæhhan, hliehhan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German lachen, also to laughter.Extra examples Don’t take life too seriously. Learn to laugh at yourself. Emilio tilted his head back and laughed good-naturedly. He laughed, and she found herself laughing with him. He laughed heartily at his own joke. He looked so funny I just had to laugh. He pulled a funny face to make us laugh. He realized how he had been fooled, and laughed bitterly. I have not heard an audience laugh so hard for a long time. I heard him suddenly laugh aloud. I laughed uneasily, trying to make light of the moment. I thought she would be angry but she just laughed. I was watching them and trying not to laugh. It looked so funny that I almost laughed out loud. It was so funny we just fell about laughing. Sam shook her head, laughing in amusement. She laughed slightly as she saw my expression. She smiles and laughs easily. She spent time talking and laughing with the children. She was fooling around and we couldn’t stop laughing. The audience laughed at her jokes. They were talking and laughing together. Tomorrow you’ll be able to laugh about this. Trent almost laughed with relief. Vivian started laughing hysterically. We were laughing over some joke Bentley had told. ‘You’re crazy!’ she laughed. He burst out laughing. She always makes me laugh. The show was hilarious—I couldn’t stop laughing.Idioms (informal) used to show that you think what somebody has just said is impossible or stupid ‘Will your dad lend you the money?’ ‘Don't make me laugh!’
    he who laughs last laughs longest
     
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    (saying) used to tell somebody not to be too proud of their present success; in the end another person may be more successful
    (British English) to laugh a lot He was killing himself laughing.
    laugh all the way to the bank
     
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    (informal) to make a lot of money easily and feel very pleased about it
    to laugh very loudly and for a long time
    laugh in somebody’s face
     
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    to show in a very obvious way that you have no respect for somebody
    (British English) to laugh very loudly
    laugh on the other side of your face
     
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    (British English, informal) to be forced to change from feeling pleased or satisfied to feeling disappointed or annoyed He’ll be laughing on the other side of his face when he reads my letter.
    laugh somebody/something out of court
     
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    (British English, informal) to completely reject an idea, a story, etc. that you think is not worth taking seriously at all All his attempts at explanation were simply laughed out of court.
    laugh till/until you cry
     
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    to laugh so long and hard that there are tears in your eyes
    laugh up your sleeve (at somebody/something)
     
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    (informal) to be secretly amused about something
    not know whether to laugh or cry
     
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    (informal) to be unable to decide how to react to a bad or unfortunate situation
    piss yourself (laughing)
     
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    to laugh very hard
    you have/you’ve got to laugh
     
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    (informal) used to say that you think there is a funny side to a situation Well, I'm sorry you've lost your shoes, but you've got to laugh, haven't you?
    Phrasal Verbslaugh at somebodylaugh somethingoff
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: laugh