English

Definition of launch verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    launch

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//lɔːntʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɔːntʃ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they launch
    BrE BrE//lɔːntʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɔːntʃ//
     
    he / she / it launches
    BrE BrE//ˈlɔːntʃɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈlɔːntʃɪz//
     
    past simple launched
    BrE BrE//lɔːntʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɔːntʃt//
     
    past participle launched
    BrE BrE//lɔːntʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɔːntʃt//
     
    -ing form launching
    BrE BrE//ˈlɔːntʃɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈlɔːntʃɪŋ//
     
    Marketing, Space travel, Travelling by boat or ship
     
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  1. 1  launch something to start an activity, especially an organized one to launch an appeal/an inquiry/an investigation/a campaign to launch an attack/invasion
  2. 2  launch something to make a product available to the public for the first time a party to launch his latest novel The new model will be launched in July. See related entries: Marketing
  3. 3  launch something to put a ship or boat into the water, especially one that has just been built The Navy is to launch a new warship today. The lifeboat was launched immediately. See related entries: Travelling by boat or ship
  4. 4  launch something to send something such as a spacecraft, weapon, etc. into space, into the sky or through water to launch a communications satellite to launch a missile/rocket/torpedo Wordfinderastronaut, countdown, dock, launch, mission, orbit, rocket, satellite, space, weightless See related entries: Space travel
  5. 5launch yourself at, from, etc. something | launch yourself forwards, etc. to jump forwards with a lot of force Without warning he launched himself at me. (figurative) She launched herself on the rock world with a brilliant album.
  6. 6 launch something (computing) to start a computer program You can launch programs and documents from your keyboard. It’s not the fastest way to launch an application.
  7. Word Originverb Middle English (in the sense ‘hurl a missile, discharge with force’): from Anglo-Norman French launcher, variant of Old French lancier, from Latin lancea (noun).Extra examples Roger suddenly launched into a hilarious impression of the headmaster. The TV celebrities helped launch an anti-drugs campaign. The appeal was officially launched last month. The company plans to launch the product next month. The satellite was successfully launched last year. A German firm launched a takeover bid for the company. A massive attack was launched in the spring of 1918. Enemy troops launched an assault on the town. Police have launched a murder enquiry. The Duchess of Cornwall, president of the charity, will launch the appeal in London. The authorities launched a massive security operation in the city. The book was launched amid a fanfare of publicity. The charity tonight launched its crusade against homelessness. The company launched a huge advertising campaign. The government has launched a new policy initiative. The police immediately launched a nationwide search for the killer. The ship was hit by three torpedoes launched from the enemy submarine. We’re going to launch a big recruitment drive in the autumn. Phrasal Verbslaunch into somethinglaunch out
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: launch