English

Definition of lobby verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

lobby

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈlɒbi//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈlɑːbi//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they lobby
BrE BrE//ˈlɒbi//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈlɑːbi//
 
he / she / it lobbies
BrE BrE//ˈlɒbiz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈlɑːbiz//
 
past simple lobbied
BrE BrE//ˈlɒbid//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈlɑːbid//
 
past participle lobbied
BrE BrE//ˈlɒbid//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈlɑːbid//
 
-ing form lobbying
BrE BrE//ˈlɒbiɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈlɑːbiɪŋ//
 
Parliament
 
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(lobbies, lobbying, lobbied, lobbied) [transitive, intransitive] lobby (somebody) (for/against something) to try to influence a politician or the government and, for example, persuade them to support or oppose a change in the law Farmers will lobby Congress for higher subsidies. Women's groups are lobbying to get more public money for children. CulturelobbyingLobbying is the practice of approaching politicians in order to persuade them to support a particular aim or cause, and to speak about it and draw attention to it. In the US this means trying to obtain the support of members of Congress or a state legislature (= people making laws at state level). In Britain lobbying involves persuading MPs or members of the House of Lords to speak in Parliament and the same is true for members of the Scottish Parliament or Welsh Assembly.Anyone can write to their MP or a member of Congress, or organize a petition (= a formal request signed by many people) about an issue. In Britain anyone can create an e-petition about anything that the government is responsible for and, if it gets at least 100,000 signatures, it will be considered for debate in the House of Commons. Most lobbying is done by pressure groups or by professional lobbyists. Pressure groups work on behalf of a particular section of society or for a specific issue or cause. Many employ full-time liaison officers to develop contacts with politicians who are likely to be sympathetic. In Britain some MPs are employed by pressure groups as consultants. They have to give details of such employment in a special Register of Members' Interests.Large companies use professional lobbyists to keep them informed of what is being discussed in Congress or Parliament and to try to persuade politicians to put forward their point of view in debates. In the US lobbyists provide information to politicians, sometimes by testifying (= giving evidence) before Congress. They also try to influence the way members of Congress vote, for example by persuading them that a certain policy will be popular with the people they represent. Lobbyists may try to influence politicians by inviting them to lunch or dinner in an expensive restaurant or to a party. There are rules limiting what gifts politicians can accept and any gifts must be reported. Some organizations have many lobbyists who are very active. In 2006 there was a political scandal when a lobbyist, Jack Abramoff, was charged with corruption.In Britain the methods which lobbyists use to influence MPs, and the question of whether MPs should be connected with lobbyists at all, came to public attention in 1996 when two MPs were found guilty of taking money in exchange for asking questions in Parliament. It became known as the cash for questions affair and led to the setting up of the Committee on Standards in Public Life and the publishing of the Register of Members' Interests for each new Parliament. See related entries: Parliament Word Origin mid 16th cent. (in the sense ‘monastic cloister’): from medieval Latin lobia, lobium ‘covered walk, portico’. The verb sense (originally US) derives from the practice of frequenting the lobby of a house of legislature to influence its members into supporting a cause.Extra examples Head teachers have been lobbying hard against education cuts. The decision followed months of intense lobbying of UN officials. The group achieved its aims after months of political lobbying. The group successfully lobbied for changes in the law. The organization has been set up to lobby the government on behalf of all the people who have lost their pensions. Women’s groups are lobbying to get more public money for childcare.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: lobby

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