Definition of logic noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    logic

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˈlɒdʒɪk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈlɑːdʒɪk//
     
    Computer programming
     
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  1. 1  [uncountable] a way of thinking or explaining something I fail to see the logic behind his argument. The two parts of the plan were governed by the same logic.
  2. 2  [uncountable, singular] sensible reasons for doing something Linking the proposals in a single package did have a certain logic. a strategy based on sound commercial logic There is no logic to/in any of their claims.
  3. 3   [uncountable] (philosophy) the science of thinking about or explaining the reason for something using formal methods the rules of logic
  4. 4[uncountable] (computing) a system or set of principles used in preparing a computer to perform a particular task See related entries: Computer programming
  5. Word Origin late Middle English: via Old French logique and late Latin logica from Greek logikē (tekhnē) ‘(art) of reason’, from logos ‘word, reason’.Extra examples I can’t follow the logic of what you are saying. In their faulty logic, this is a great injustice. It’s a stupid decision that completely defies logic. Philosophers use logic to prove their arguments. The logic of this argument is very obscure. The music has its own inner logic. The plan had a simple logic to it. There doesn’t seem to be any logic in the move. There is a compelling logic to his main theory. There is sound commercial logic in never giving credit to retailers. They questioned the logic underlying his actions. This is clearly a case of circular logic. What kind of twisted logic is that? What’s the logic behind this decision? You can’t use the same logic in dealing with children. The two parts of the plan are governed by the same logic.