Definition of lot pronoun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Oxford3000

lot

pronoun
lɒt
 
; lɑːt
 
 
a lot (also informal lots) lot (to do) a large number or amount‘How many do you need?’ ‘A lot.’Have some more cake. There's lots left.She still has an awful lot(= a very large amount) to learn.He has invited nearly a hundred people but a lot aren't able to come.Usage noteUsage note: many / a lot of / lots ofMany is used only with countable nouns. It is used mainly in questions and negative sentences:Do you go to many concerts? How many people came to the meeting? I don’t go to many concerts. Although it is not common in statements, it is used after so, as and too:You made too many mistakes.In statements a lot of or lots of (informal) are much more common:I go to a lot of concerts. ‘How many CDs have you got?’ ‘Lots!’ However, they are not used with measurements of time or distance:I stayed in England for many/quite a few/ten weeks. I stayed in England a lot of weeks. When a lot of/lots of means ‘many’, it takes a plural verb:Lots of people like Italian food. You can also use plenty of (informal):Plenty of stores stay open late. These phrases can also be used in questions and negative sentences.A lot of/lots of is still felt to be informal, especially in British English, so in formal writing it is better to use many or a large number of in statements. note at muchUsage noteUsage note: much / a lot of / lots ofMuch is used only with uncountable nouns. It is used mainly in questions and negative sentences:Do you have much free time? How much experience have you had? I don’t have much free time.In statements a lot of or lots of (informal) is much more common:‘How much (money) does she earn? She earns a lot of money. You can also use plenty (of). These phrases can also be used in questions and negative sentences.A lot of/lots of is still felt to be informal, especially in British English, so in formal writing it is better to use much, a great deal of or a large amount of.Very much and a lot can be used as adverbs:I miss my family very much. I miss very much my family. I miss my family a lot. Thanks a lot. In negative sentences you can use much:I didn’t enjoy the film (very) much. note at many