Definition of lucrative adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

lucrative

 adjective
adjective
BrE BrE//ˈluːkrətɪv//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈluːkrətɪv//
 
Describing jobs
 
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producing a large amount of money; making a large profit a lucrative business/contract/market Had the plan worked it would have proved highly lucrative. Synonymssuccessfulprofitable commercial lucrative economicThese words all describe somebody/​something that is making or is likely to make money.successful making a lot of money, especially by being popular:The play was very successful on Broadway. The company has had another successful year.profitable making a profit:a highly profitable businesscommercial [only before noun] making or intended to make a profit:The movie was not a commercial success (= made no profit).lucrative (of business or work) producing or paying a large amount of money; making a large profit:They do a lot of business in lucrative overseas markets.economic (often used in negative sentences) (of a process, business or activity) producing enough profit to continue:Small local shops stop being economic when a supermarket opens up nearby.Patterns a successful/​profitable/​lucrative business a successful/​profitable/​lucrative year a(n) commercial/​economic success See related entries: Describing jobs Word Origin late Middle English: from Latin lucrativus, from lucrat- ‘gained’, from the verb lucrari, from lucrum.Extra examples a financially lucrative venture Many of the engineers left the service for more lucrative jobs abroad. The firm has a lucrative business contract with the Scottish Executive. They do a lot of business in lucrative overseas markets.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: lucrative