Definition of lurch verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    lurch

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//lɜːtʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɜːrtʃ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they lurch
    BrE BrE//lɜːtʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɜːrtʃ//
     
    he / she / it lurches
    BrE BrE//ˈlɜːtʃɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈlɜːrtʃɪz//
     
    past simple lurched
    BrE BrE//lɜːtʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɜːrtʃt//
     
    past participle lurched
    BrE BrE//lɜːtʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɜːrtʃt//
     
    -ing form lurching
    BrE BrE//ˈlɜːtʃɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈlɜːrtʃɪŋ//
     
    Fear
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) to make a sudden, unsteady movement forward or sideways synonym stagger, sway Suddenly the horse lurched to one side and the child fell off. The man lurched drunkenly out of the pub. (figurative) Their relationship seems to lurch from one crisis to the next.
  2. 2[intransitive] if your heart or stomach lurches, you have a sudden feeling of fear or excitement See related entries: Fear
  3. Word Originverb late 17th cent. (as a noun denoting the sudden leaning of a ship to one side): of unknown origin.Extra examples A man lurched into her office. He lurched towards the door. She gave a little cry and lurched forward. Suddenly the train lurched violently. The bus lurched along the mountain road. The drunk lurched to his feet and tried to follow us. A man lurched drunkenly along the street. She was singing as she lurched off. Suddenly the horse lurched to one side. The car lurched forward.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: lurch