Definition of mad adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    mad

     adjective
    adjective
    BrE BrE//mæd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//mæd//
     
    (madder, maddest) Excitement, Describing strange traits, Stupid, Anger
     
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  1. 1  (especially British English) having a mind that does not work normally; mentally ill They realized that he had gone mad. Inventors are not mad scientists. I'll go mad if I have to wait much longer. She seemed to have gone stark raving mad. A revolver is the only way to stop a mad dog. see also barking mad Synonymsmadcrazy nuts batty out of your mind (not) in your right mindThese are all informal words that describe somebody who has a mind that does not work normally.mad (informal, especially British English) having a mind that does not work normally:I thought I’d go mad if I stayed any longer. Mad is an informal word used to suggest that somebody’s behaviour is very strange, often because of extreme emotional pressure. It is offensive if used to describe somebody suffering from a real mental illness; use mentally ill instead. Mad is not usually used in this meaning in North American English; use crazy instead.crazy (informal, ) having a mind that does not work normally:A crazy old woman rented the upstairs room. Like mad, crazy is offensive if used to describe somebody suffering from a real mental illness.nuts [not before noun] (informal) mad:That noise is driving me nuts! You guys are nuts!batty (informal, especially British English) slightly mad, in a harmless way:Her mum’s completely batty.out of your mind (informal) unable to think or behave normally, especially because of extreme shock or anxiety:She was out of her mind with grief.(not) in your right mind (informal) (not) mentally normal:No one in their right mind would choose to work there.Patterns to be mad/​crazy/​nuts/​out of your mind/​not in your right mind to do something to go mad/​crazy/​nuts/​batty to drive somebody mad/​crazy/​nuts/​batty/​out of their mind completely mad/​crazy/​nuts/​batty/​out of your mind See related entries: Describing strange traits
  2. 2  (informal, especially British English) very stupid; not at all sensible You must be mad to risk it. It was a mad idea. ‘I'm going to buy some new clothes.’ ‘Well, don't go mad (= spend more than is sensible).’ See related entries: Stupid
  3. 3  [not before noun] mad (at/with somebody) | mad (about something) (informal, especially North American English) very angry He got mad and walked out. She's mad at me for being late. (British English) That noise is driving me mad. (British English) He'll go mad when he sees the damage. Synonymsangrymad indignant cross irateThese words all describe people feeling and/​or showing anger.angry feeling or showing anger:Please don’t be angry with me. Thousands of angry demonstrators filled the square.mad [not before noun] (informal, especially North American English) angry:He got mad and walked out. She’s mad at me for being late. Mad is the usual word for ‘angry’ in informal American English. In British English, the phrase ‘go mad’ means ‘very angry’:Dad’ll go mad when he sees what you’ve done. ‘Go mad’ can also mean ‘go crazy’ or ‘get very excited’.indignant feeling or showing anger and surprise because you think that you or somebody else has been treated unfairly:She was very indignant at the way she had been treated.cross (especially British English, rather informal) rather angry or annoyed:I was quite cross with him for being late. This word is often used by or to children.irate very angry:irate customers an irate letter Irate is not usually followed by a preposition:She was irate with me/​about it.Patterns angry/​mad/​indignant/​cross about/​at something angry/​cross with somebody (for doing something) angry/​mad/​indignant/​cross that to get angry/​mad/​cross to make somebody angry/​mad/​cross See related entries: Anger
  4. 4  [not usually before noun] mad (about/on something/somebody) (British English, informal) liking something/somebody very much; very interested in something to be mad on tennis He's always been mad about kids. football-mad boys She's completely power-mad.
  5. 5  done without thought or control; wild and excited The crowd made a mad rush for the exit. Only a mad dash got them to the meeting on time. (British English) The team won and the fans went mad. mad with something (British English) to be mad with anger/excitement/grief/love See related entries: Excitement
  6. compare crazy
    More Like This Consonant-doubling adjectives big, drab, fat, fit, flat, hot, mad, red, sad, wetSee worksheet. Word Origin Old English gemǣd(e)d ‘maddened’, participial form related to gemād ‘mad’, of Germanic origin.Extra examples He’s absolutely mad about cars. Her colleagues thought her quite mad. His experiences in the First World War drove him mad. I get so mad when people don’t take me seriously. I went mad with joy and danced a little jig. It makes me really mad when people waste food. My mum’s absolutely mad with me! Please don’t be mad with me! She’s really mad about painting. The children are driving me mad! The world had gone completely mad. What a barking mad idea! You must be stark raving mad to risk your money like that! ‘I’m going to buy some new clothes.’ ‘Well, don’t go mad.’ Dad’ll go mad when he sees what you’ve done. He must be barking mad to attempt something like that. He’s always been mad about kids. I thought I’d go mad if I stayed any longer. She seemed to have gone stark raving mad. She’s completely power-mad. She’s mad at me for being late. She’s mad on tennis. That noise is driving me mad. The local people all thought he was mad. The team won and the fans went mad.Idioms
    be mad for somebody/something
     
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    (British English, informal) to like or want somebody/something very much Scott's mad for peanuts.
    (informal) very angry See related entries: Anger (informal) very fast, hard, much, etc. I had to run like mad to catch the bus.
    (as) mad as a hatter/a March hare
     
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    (informal) (of a person) mentally ill; very silly Because of the chemicals used in hat-making, workers often suffered from mercury poisoning, which can cause loss of memory and damage to the nervous system. Lewis Carroll was probably thinking of this when he created the eccentric character of the Hatter in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. A March hare was called mad because of the strange behaviour of hares during the mating season. More Like ThisSimiles in idioms (as) bald as a coot, (as) blind as a bat, (as) bright as a button, (as) bold as brass, as busy as a bee, as clean as a whistle, (as) dead as a/​the dodo, (as) deaf as a post, (as) dull as ditchwater, (as) fit as a fiddle, as flat as a pancake, (as) good as gold, (as) mad as a hatter/​a March hare, (as) miserable/​ugly as sin, as old as the hills, (as) pleased as Punch, as pretty as a picture, (as) regular as clockwork, (as) quick as a flash, (as) safe as houses, (as) sound as a bell, (as) steady as a rock, (as) thick as two short planks, (as) tough as old bootsSee worksheet.
    mad keen (on something/somebody)
     
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    (British English, informal) liking something/somebody very much; very interested in something He's mad keen on planes.
    (stark) raving mad/bonkers
     
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    (informal) completely crazy