English

Definition of mooch verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    mooch

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//muːtʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//muːtʃ//
     
    (informal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they mooch
    BrE BrE//muːtʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//muːtʃ//
     
    he / she / it mooches
    BrE BrE//ˈmuːtʃɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈmuːtʃɪz//
     
    past simple mooched
    BrE BrE//muːtʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//muːtʃt//
     
    past participle mooched
    BrE BrE//muːtʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//muːtʃt//
     
    -ing form mooching
    BrE BrE//ˈmuːtʃɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈmuːtʃɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] + adv./prep. (British English) to walk slowly with no particular purpose; to be somewhere not doing very much synonym potter He's happy to mooch around the house all day. We had coffee then mooched down to the beach.
  2. 2[intransitive, transitive] mooch (something) (off somebody) (North American English) to get money, food, etc. from somebody else instead of paying for it yourself synonym cadge He's always mooching off his friends.
  3. Word Origin late Middle English (in the sense ‘to hoard’): probably from Old French muchier (Anglo-Norman muscher) ‘hide, skulk’. Current senses date from the mid 19th cent.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: mooch