Definition of moot verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

moot

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//muːt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//muːt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they moot
BrE BrE//muːt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//muːt//
 
he / she / it moots
BrE BrE//muːts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//muːts//
 
past simple mooted
BrE BrE//ˈmuːtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈmuːtɪd//
 
past participle mooted
BrE BrE//ˈmuːtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈmuːtɪd//
 
-ing form mooting
BrE BrE//ˈmuːtɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈmuːtɪŋ//
 
 
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[usually passive] moot something (formal) to suggest an idea for people to discuss synonym propose, put forward The plan was first mooted at last week’s meeting. It had been mooted that there should be a study period after school. Word Origin Old English mōt ‘assembly ’or‘ meeting’ and mōtian ‘to converse’, of Germanic origin; related to meet. The adjective (originally an attributive noun use: see moot court) dates from the mid 16th cent.; the current verb sense dates from the mid 17th cent.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: moot