English

Definition of moralize verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

moralize

 verb
(British English also -ise) verb
BrE BrE//ˈmɒrəlaɪz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈmɔːrəlaɪz//
 
, NAmE//ˈmɑːrəlaɪz//
 
[intransitive] (usually disapproving)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they moralize
BrE BrE//ˈmɒrəlaɪz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈmɔːrəlaɪz//
 
, NAmE//ˈmɑːrəlaɪz//
 
he / she / it moralizes
BrE BrE//ˈmɒrəlaɪzɪz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈmɔːrəlaɪzɪz//
 
, NAmE//ˈmɑːrəlaɪzɪz//
 
past simple moralized
BrE BrE//ˈmɒrəlaɪzd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈmɔːrəlaɪzd//
 
, NAmE//ˈmɑːrəlaɪzd//
 
past participle moralized
BrE BrE//ˈmɒrəlaɪzd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈmɔːrəlaɪzd//
 
, NAmE//ˈmɑːrəlaɪzd//
 
-ing form moralizing
BrE BrE//ˈmɒrəlaɪzɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈmɔːrəlaɪzɪŋ//
 
, NAmE//ˈmɑːrəlaɪzɪŋ//
 
Moral
 
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to tell other people what is right and wrong especially in order to emphasize that your opinions are correct synonym preach He’s always moralizing about ‘young people today’. See related entries: Moral Word Origin late Middle English (in the sense ‘explain the moral meaning of’): from French moraliser or medieval Latin moralizare, from late Latin moralis, from mos, mor- ‘custom’, (plural) mores ‘morals’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: moralize