English

Definition of notice noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    notice

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˈnəʊtɪs//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈnoʊtɪs//
     
    Types of text, The press, Buying a home
     
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    paying attention
  1. 1  [uncountable] the fact of somebody paying attention to somebody/something or knowing about something Don't take any notice of what you read in the papers. Take no notice of what he says. These protests have really made the government sit up and take notice (= realize the importance of the situation). It was Susan who brought the problem to my notice (= told me about it). Normally, the letter would not have come to my notice (= I would not have known about it). (formal) It will not have escaped your notice that there have been some major changes in the company.
  2. giving information
  3. 2  [countable] a sheet of paper giving written or printed information, usually put in a public place There was a notice on the board saying the class had been cancelled. A public notice about the planned development was pinned to the wall.
  4. 3  [countable] a board or sign giving information, an instruction or a warning a notice saying ‘Keep off the Grass’
  5. announcing something
  6. 4[countable] a small advertisement or announcement in a newspaper or magazine notices of births, marriages and deaths See related entries: The press
  7. 5[countable] a short announcement made at the beginning or end of a meeting, a church service, etc. There are just two notices this week.
  8. warning
  9. 6  [uncountable] information or a warning given in advance of something that is going to happen You must give one month's notice. Prices may be altered without notice. The bar is closed until further notice (= until you are told that it is open again). You are welcome to come and stay as long as you give us plenty of notice.
  10. when leaving job/house
  11. 7[uncountable] a formal letter or statement saying that you will or must leave your job or house at the end of a particular period of time He has handed in his notice. They gave her two weeks' notice. Tenants must give written notice to the landlord of their intention to move out of the property. Dozens of families on the estate have been given notice to quit (= told to leave their homes). 500 workers have been issued with redundancy notices. We received an eviction notice today. See related entries: Buying a home
  12. review of book/play
  13. 8[countable] a short article in a newspaper or magazine, giving an opinion about a book, play, etc. The play got good notices in the national press. See related entries: Types of text, The press
  14. Word Origin late Middle English (in sense (6) of the noun): from Old French, from Latin notitia ‘being known’, from notus ‘known’, past participle of noscere.Extra examples His landlord gave him two months’ notice to quit. I caught notice of a small scrap of paper on my desk. It won’t have escaped your notice that I’m feeling rather pleased with myself. It’s the best we can do at such short notice. Normally such matters would not come to my notice. She’s given notice that she intends to leave. She’s on a week’s notice, which doesn’t give her long to find another job. Take no notice of what you read in the papers. The bank requires three days’ notice. The change was too subtle to attract much notice. The company has issued warning notices saying that all water should be boiled. The disease came to public notice in the 80s. The notice about his resignation went up this morning. The team is ready to go anywhere in the world at a moment’s notice. The tenants could soon be served with eviction notices. There are notices about where to park. They cut off the electricity without notice. This new law serves notice that criminals will not go unpunished. A public notice about the planned development was pinned to the wall. He has handed in his notice. It was Susan who brought the problem to my notice. It will not have escaped your notice that there have been some changes in the company. Normally, the letter would not have come to my notice. Take no notice of what he says. The bar is closed until further notice. The protest really made the government sit up and take notice. There was a notice on the board saying the class had been cancelled. There was a notice saying ‘Keep off the Grass’. You are welcome to come and stay as long as you give us plenty of notice. You must give one month’s notice of your intention to move out of the property.Idioms
    at short notice, at a moment’s notice
     
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    not long in advance; without warning or time for preparation This was the best room we could get at such short notice. You must be ready to leave at a moment's notice.
    (North American English) = at short notice
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: notice