Definition of offer verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    offer

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈɒfə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɔːfər//
     
    , NAmE//ˈɑːfər//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they offer
    BrE BrE//ˈɒfə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɔːfər//
     
    , NAmE//ˈɑːfər//
     
    he / she / it offers
    BrE BrE//ˈɒfəz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɔːfərz//
     
    , NAmE//ˈɑːfərz//
     
    past simple offered
    BrE BrE//ˈɒfəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɔːfərd//
     
    , NAmE//ˈɑːfərd//
     
    past participle offered
    BrE BrE//ˈɒfəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɔːfərd//
     
    , NAmE//ˈɑːfərd//
     
    -ing form offering
    BrE BrE//ˈɒfərɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɔːfərɪŋ//
     
    , NAmE//ˈɑːfərɪŋ//
     
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1  [transitive, intransitive] to say that you are willing to do something for somebody or give something to somebody offer (something) Josie had offered her services as a guide. He offered some useful advice. I don't think they need help, but I think I should offer anyway. offer something (to somebody) (for something) He offered $4 000 for the car. They are offering a reward for the return of their cat. They decided to offer the job to Jo. offer somebody something They decided to offer Jo the job. I gratefully took the cup of coffee she offered me. Taylor offered him 500 dollars to do the work. offer to do something The kids offered to do the dishes. + speech ‘I'll do it,’ she offered. Express YourselfOffering somebody somethingParticularly when you are the host, you may want to make polite offers to your guests: Would you like a magazine to read? Can I get you a coffee? Can I offer you something to drink? How about something to eat? I could make some sandwiches. If you'd like to use/​If you need the bathroom, it's the second door on the right. Feel free to go upstairs and have a rest if you'd like to.Responses: That would be nice. I'd like a cup of tea, please. Yes, please. A glass of orange juice would be lovely. If you're sure it's no trouble, I'd love a coffee. No, thank you. I'm fine for now. Not for me, thanks. I'm fine, thanks. Maybe later. Express YourselfOffering to do somethingThere are various ways of offering and accepting help: Would you like me to help you with that? Can I give you a hand? Can I help you with that? Shall I carry that for you? (British English or formal, North American English) Would it help if I spoke to Julie before you call her? Let me take your bag. If there's anything I can do (to help), let me know.Responses: That's very kind/​nice/​generous/​thoughtful of you. Thank you. It's all right, thank you. I can manage/​do it. Thanks. That would be very helpful. More Like This Verbs usually followed by infinitives afford, agree, appear, arrange, attempt, beg, choose, consent, decide, expect, fail, happen, hesitate, hope, intend, learn, manage, mean, neglect, offer, prepare, pretend, promise, refuse, swear, try, want, wishSee worksheet.
  2. 2  [transitive] offer something to make something available or to provide the opportunity for something The hotel offers excellent facilities for families. The job didn't offer any prospects for promotion. He did not offer any explanation for his behaviour.
  3. 3[transitive] offer something/somebody (up) (to somebody) (formal) to give something to God We offered up our prayers for the men's safe return. More Like This Verbs with two objects bet, bring, build, buy, cost, get, give, leave, lend, make, offer, owe, pass, pay, play, post, promise, read, refuse, sell, send, show, sing, take, teach, tell, throw, wish, writeSee worksheet.
  4. Word Origin Old English offrian ‘sacrifice something to a deity’, of Germanic origin, from Latin offerre ‘bestow, present’ (in ecclesiastical Latin ‘offer to God’), reinforced by French offrir (which continued to express the primary sense). The noun (late Middle English) is from French offre.Extra examples ‘Do you need any help?’ he offered impulsively. Hospitality was freely offered to refugees. I refer to your recent application and interview and am pleased to offer you the post of editor. She felt obliged to offer him a bed for the night. She graciously offered to get pizza so I wouldn’t have to cook. She offered drinks to her guests. The open evening is a chance to see what the college has to offer students. The plan seemed to offer real advantages. They claim to offer a more comprehensive service than other companies. They have offered over £500 000 for the house. This investment is likely to offer a higher return. This player has proved that he still has a lot to offer. Would they be prepared to offer any more? the protection that life insurance can offer ‘I’ll do it,’ she offered. He offered £4 000 for the car. Taylor offered him $500 to do the work. The job didn’t offer any prospects for promotion.Idioms
    have something to offer
     
    jump to other results
    to have something available that somebody wants Oxford has a lot to offer visitors in the way of entertainment. a young man with a great deal to offer (= who is intelligent, has many skills, etc.)
    (formal) to hold out your hand for somebody to shake
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: offer