English

Definition of oppose verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    oppose

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//əˈpəʊz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈpoʊz//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they oppose
    BrE BrE//əˈpəʊz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈpoʊz//
     
    he / she / it opposes
    BrE BrE//əˈpəʊzɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈpoʊzɪz//
     
    past simple opposed
    BrE BrE//əˈpəʊzd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈpoʊzd//
     
    past participle opposed
    BrE BrE//əˈpəʊzd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈpoʊzd//
     
    -ing form opposing
    BrE BrE//əˈpəʊzɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈpoʊzɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  to disagree strongly with somebody’s plan, policy, etc. and try to change it or prevent it from succeeding oppose somebody/something This party would bitterly oppose the re-introduction of the death penalty. He threw all those that opposed him into prison. oppose (somebody/something) doing something I would oppose changing the law. compare propose
  2. 2oppose somebody to compete with somebody in a contest He intends to oppose the prime minister in the leadership election.
  3. Word Origin late Middle English: from Old French opposer, from Latin opponere (from ob- ‘against’ + ponere ‘place’), but influenced by Latin oppositus ‘set or placed against’ and Old French poser ‘to place’.Extra examples The ban was initially opposed by the US. The minister has consistently opposed any relaxation in the law. We totally oppose the use of gas to kill any animal. We would vigorously oppose such a policy. He found himself opposed by his own deputy.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: oppose