Definition of order verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    order

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈɔːdə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɔːrdər//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they order
    BrE BrE//ˈɔːdə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɔːrdər//
     
    he / she / it orders
    BrE BrE//ˈɔːdəz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɔːrdərz//
     
    past simple ordered
    BrE BrE//ˈɔːdəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɔːrdərd//
     
    past participle ordered
    BrE BrE//ˈɔːdəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɔːrdərd//
     
    -ing form ordering
    BrE BrE//ˈɔːdərɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɔːrdərɪŋ//
     
    Online shopping, Dining out
     
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    give instructions
  1. 1  [transitive] to use your position of authority to tell somebody to do something or say that something must happen order somebody to do something The company was ordered to pay compensation to its former employees. The officer ordered them to fire. order somebody + adv./prep. They were ordered out of the class for fighting. order something The government has ordered an investigation into the accident. The judge ordered a retrial. order that… They ordered that for every tree cut down two more be planted. (British English also) They ordered that for every tree cut down two more should be planted. order (somebody) + speech ‘Sit down and be quiet,’ she ordered. Synonymsordertell instruct direct commandThese words all mean to use your position of authority to say to somebody that they must do something.order to use your position of authority to tell somebody to do something:The company was ordered to pay compensation to its former employee. ‘Come here at once!’ she ordered.tell to say to somebody that they must or should do something:He was told to sit down and wait. Don’t tell me what to do!instruct (rather formal) to tell somebody to do something, especially in a formal or official way:The letter instructed him to report to headquarters immediately.direct (formal) to give an official order:The judge directed the jury to return a verdict of not guilty.command to use your position of authority to tell somebody to do something:He commanded his men to retreat.order or command? Order is a more general word than command and can be used about anyone in a position of authority, such as a parent, teacher or government telling somebody to do something. Command is slightly stronger than order and is the normal word to use about an army officer giving orders, or in any context where it is normal to give orders without any discussion about them. It is less likely to be used about a parent or teacher.Patterns to order/​tell/​instruct/​direct/​command somebody to do something to order/​instruct/​direct/​command that… to do something as ordered/​told/​instructed/​directed/​commanded Express YourselfTelling somebody to do something Could you wait here for a moment, please? Would you come through now?/You can come through now. Can you send it up to my room, please? Just sign here for me, please. I need you to finish the report by Friday. Everyone has to use the side entrance this week. You have to sign these reports before submitting them.
  2. goods/service
  3. 2  [transitive] to ask for goods to be made or supplied; to ask for a service to be provided order something (from somebody) These boots can be ordered direct from the manufacturer. order somebody something Shall I order you a taxi? order something for somebody Shall I order a taxi for you? See related entries: Online shopping
  4. food/drink
  5. 3  [transitive, intransitive] to ask for something to eat or drink in a restaurant, bar, etc. order (something) I ordered a beer and a sandwich. Have you ordered yet? order somebody/yourself something He ordered himself a double whisky. order (something) (for somebody) Will you order for me while I make a phone call? See related entries: Dining out
  6. organize/arrange
  7. 4[transitive] order something (formal) to organize or arrange something I need time to order my thoughts. see also ordered, disordered
  8. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French ordre, from Latin ordo, ordin- ‘row, series, rank’.Extra examples All foreign journalists have been ordered out of the country. All our products can be ordered online. Different senses of a word are ordered according to frequency. He was ordered off for bringing down the striker. She led a highly ordered existence, with everything having its own time and place. Stop ordering me around! The army’s Chief of Staff had personally ordered the raid. The entries are ordered alphabetically. The general had personally ordered the raid. There were seven bookings and two players were ordered off. We can order the book for you, if you like. You can order the book direct from the publisher. ‘Come here at once!’ she ordered. He ordered himself a whisky. I need time to order my thoughts. I’d like to order some books, please. I’ll order a taxi for you. I’ve ordered some sandwiches. In the periodic table elements are ordered according to atomic number. Stop trying to order me around! The Justice Minister has ordered an investigation into the matter. The books are ordered alphabetically by title. The company was ordered to pay compensation to its former employee. The furniture can be ordered direct from the manufacturer. The waiter asked if we were ready to order. Troops were ordered back from the area.Idioms
    just what the doctor ordered
     
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    (humorous) exactly what somebody wants or needs
    Phrasal Verbsorder somebody about
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: order